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Informative and in context There are endless ways to style this depending on the amount of attention you want to draw. Regardless of the prominence, some explanation of why the bookmark is leaving is in order. If this is going to be a frequent occurrence, I would display this alert once, possibly for a limited amount of time or with an option to dismiss. ...


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Any good solution to your problem will keep the user informed of what is going on. A separate folder that contains archived bookmarks is a good start since it will keep the bookmark list tidy and free of broken links. It is possible, however, that a user might not understand why their link is gone from the list. Therefore I would suggest some sort of ...


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You can cross it with a red line like this : You can than move it to the bottom of the list or to a separate trash folder. There are problems with both solutions: Keeping it in the original list conveys the deletion to the viewer but even though the entry was deleted, it will still be there with the rest of the bookmarks. A solution for this is to ask ...


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I'll answer this question in a different way - what things don't most companies have or do when they want to properly test web application for accessibility: A design strategy or framework that is not just about accessibility, but inclusive design (this is another topic/question altogether). A range of actual devices (not just simulations or emulators) to ...


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Users take the trouble of manually setting accessibility settings for a reason. They want (or need) high contrast or large fonts. They want the site to be in their language. To the user, logging in is just another action they're taking on your site. It's no different than any other page on the site. And perhaps there are other pages or content that can be ...


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It really comes to two basic Usability Issues 1) User Expectations (Was user expecting the same settings he set in the last session? I guess YES) 2) Flexibility + Freedom of Control (Users should have option to go back to default settings) Just for example if i leave 2 items in my cart on any site and when i visit back and see my cart empty. It is not ...


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My recommendation would be to set the: image's alt attribute to specify a text equivalent for the image link's title attribute to describe the resource being linked to <A href="https://lebowskifest.com/fests/lebowski-fest-new-york" title="Lebowski Fest New York in August 2014"> <IMG ...


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ALT text serves a dual purpose. Purpose 1: Simple Google search for "purpose of alt tag" shows the following answer... The alt text within the ALT tag should let the user know what an image's content and purpose are. Alt text is accessed by screen reader users to provide them with a text equivalent of images. In visual browsers, the alt text is ...


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first, I'd consider if an image is actually the best way, in any case, to act as a link; unless the you literally make it super clear that clicking the image will link you to this or that end point, aka as a signifier; perhaps you can show (a basic version of) your link image, which would help to asses that. Provided that you give the image a clear ...


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I don't think syntax highlighting should break accessibility. Of course if someone uses instead of with proper CSS to highlight some keywords it can affect screen reader output - some of them change voice for strong in case of it is semantic markup. What can cause issues is line numbers which are often added by those tools. They are of course huge UX and ...


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Suffering from cataracts myself, I can assure you from myself, as well as others, that white or very light text on black is much more efficient for us. The research is there as well if you research low vision disorders. It all had to do with the amount of bright white light. There are some screens on some programs where there is so much white, all we see is ...



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