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1

You mentioned you are a novice developer. In addition to the other great answers I want to answer on that perspective. HTML and CSS are designed with accessibility in mind. Making good use of them is the first step. It's not just about following W3C guidelines but also understanding them. Understand the semantics of HTML elements, learn about aria ...


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Keep in mind that the best way to ensure that you meet accessibility requirements is not to simply run through a checklist of criteria that are mostly based on technical implementation details. WCAG 2.0 guidelines were very specific about doing 'human' testing to ensure that the site does more than just meeting technical specifications because it is only ...


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WCAG2.0 is the currently generally-accepted standard for accessibility. Section 508 compliance checklists also exist (http://www.section508.gov/summary-section508-standards) but may be outdated: the original 508 guidelines are comparatively vague, and were written before e.g. screenreaders could interpret javascript so are more restrictive than necessary. ...


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There is a partial explanation here: http://webaim.org/articles/visual/lowvision#highcontrast WebAim's recommendation is to allow the user to choose foreground and background. One of the reasons why some people prefer black background and white or orange text is to minimise eye strain, especially if you are looking at the screen for a long time, e.g. ...


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Do you have a copy of JAWS and/or NVDA? Thee are some good resources which describe how to use iframes from an accessibility point of view: http://webaim.org/techniques/frames/ http://lab.dotjay.co.uk/tests/screen-readers/iframes/ http://accessibility.psu.edu/frames/ These links also describe some of the challenges you may face. Scrolling is not an ...


1

According to the Wikipedia entry on high/low context cultureL In a higher-context culture, many things are left unsaid, letting the culture explain. Words and word choice become very important in higher-context communication, since a few words can communicate a complex message very effectively to an in-group (but less effectively outside that ...


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In my experience from English to Spanish your layout and design patterns need to be extremely fluid. Things like product description, prices and other content elements seem to take more real estate. This of course will vary from language to language.


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There is no such thing as website exclusively built for the blind or handicapped. In fact by creating a separate website, you are indirectly isolating these people with disabilities and defeats the purpose of web accessibility. A good design/coding should be inclusive and be able to meet everybody's needs. You cannot "Tab" through the radio buttons ...


1

Well, tag is used to group related elements in a form - so yes. You can also take usage of legend and label inside your fieldset, i.e.: <fieldset> <legend>Date</legend> <label><select><option value=".....</select> Day</label> <label><select><option value=".....</select> ...


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Yes fieldset is better option as it allows you to group set of fields and also allows you to mark up your data.


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Yes <fieldset> should be used for grouping inputs for text, radio-dials, checkboxes and other related content that should be grouped together so this would include both input and select elements.


38

No. Best practice is not to have a separate screen-reader version of the site. Suggesting you should have a screen-reader version of the site infers that your main site won't be. Which doesn't really make any sense, because a non-screen-reader optimised site would be one not built to proper HTML web standards. And why would you intentionally build a ...



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