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0

It depends on how important the text is that the user is reading. If it's just information the user might need... maybe entered information would be a better description, then the accept button should ALWAYS be displayed. However, if there's some critical warning or license agreement the user must acknowledge then the user should be forced to scroll ...


0

For accessibility, I can't understand your question. You can manage programmatically the appear/disappear of elements and using ARIA, role and html attributes you can do exactly what you want. Anyway: - about hiding elements, the elements should be hidden using position:absolute; in order to keep them available only for AT. If you want to hide them to AT ...


-1

The best way to solve is is to have the machine make fast repeated but at a lower tone of beeps while the card is being read, and then make a high pitched beep when finished.


0

I use a system simular to that. They have a red background with a hand held up while processing, and then a green background with a circled white check mark in it when it is finished.


1

As users are likely not used to technology working this slowly, the best system may be one that uses a combination of methods to help guide them to using the system correctly. However, (as other answers have shown) it's difficult to convey "waiting" through a static visual aid alone, and it may be too costly to add a screen conveying proper use. I think ...


23

This is where I'd argue that UX isn't the one to fix this. All they can do is apply duct tape and band aids to a poorly implemented technology. Fix the technology. It simply shouldn't take 3 seconds to read an RFID chip. On top of that, asking each person to wait 3 seconds to pass through seems like a logistical nightmare for crowd management. This is ...


0

One system that is used in the city I live in: The reading apparatus is different between single beeps (check-in before entering the metro) and long reads (e.g. buying subscriptions). On the machines where the cards are read for a long time, the card is meant to be inserted in a sort of vertical slot, where the reader is, so it's I think evident for the user ...


80

Great question! This is an good case for microinteraction design. Microinteraction objectives In descending order of priority: Provide clear affordance for user to place card/wallet on reader Provide clear feedback that the user should hold the card on the reader until an outcome. Since this is public transportation, provide blind- and deaf- friendly ...


7

Adding to Alexey's great answer: You could have the reader play a sequence of tones in a scale that move toward a resolution; when the card is done reading, a resolving chord would play. This would make it even clearer that the reader is done, eliminating any doubt as to whether the sequence of notes is finished. I believe this could be done in such a way ...


11

The XBox added a visual camera input device called the Kinect. They defined a number of gesture inputs, covered on the linked page and this one. This 2nd link includes the 'hold to select' gesture. Point the palm of your hand toward the screen, and move the on-screen hand over the item you want to select. To select an item, keep your hand over the item ...


4

Audio only feedback - Play a rising tone that ends in a pleasant note when finished. Initially users would not know what the tone meant but once they use it the first time they will be trained. Or play a slightly annoying sound that ends once the card is read. Think like the scratchy changing sound of the geiger counter. Visual feedback - A single yellow ...


18

In the Parliament of Ukraine they use both visual and audial means while voting, you can see youtube video (~10s). The sound consist of several tones which are percieved as the sequence, so stopping it somewhere in the middle sounds not natural. The row has some kind of harmony and natural feeling of the length. You could try to play some ~3s sound when ...


7

You can start looking at existing systems in the public sector. Take for example pedestrian-crossing lights with a ticking sound for visually impaired people. It's a continuously ticking sound and it ticks fast enough to notice something is in progress. It can be a softer, shorter and different sound than the beep. For those who can't hear it can be combined ...


0

I’m not a programmer, but I’m interested in this topic. As I know (as an app user), Invert Colors in iOS device is to make the digital screen comfortable to look at and ease the eyestrain. The usage of Invert Colors in iOS is the same as F.lux in Windows/Mac computer, Twilight (a free app) in Android phone. Since Apple has lots of limits for approving an app ...


0

Maybe the style should be in <style /> ? CSS: .prev:before { content: "« "; } .next:after { content: " »"; } HTML: <a class="prev" href="prev.html">previous</a> <a class="next" href="next.html">next</a> Result would be something like: « previous next »


0

I just did the same as nightning when I had to bring a table (only 6 columns) into a 320 px version for mobile users. My first move was to delete all the columns that had information the user wouldn't actually need. It was just given, because... well, because obviously. So there are only 4 columns left. It flips to column again for tablet users and above, ...


1

Tables are soooo 90s (they are about to turn 30) HTML tables were proposed in 1993 and took off around 1996. During this time, few considered accessibility and even less predicted responsive design. UX was never considered in the process. This case isn't unique, there are many other HTML standards that nowadays look ludicrous - selects and radio groups all ...


2

It is interesting to me that the problem with large multi-column tables is not being solved by creating better content and information architecture, because regardless of how responsive or accessible the table is the information is still going to be unusable to the reader if there is simply too much information. The question of how to fit a large amount of ...


5

Hmmm take a look at this: https://github.com/filamentgroup/tablesaw As width is reduced, the table converts over into a listing. You do lose the ability to do row comparisons, but it does ensure data remains accessible for small screen sizes.



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