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Why zoom can be important My parents are in their 70s and are sophisticated users for their age (mom plays video games!). They have large mobile phones (mom has an iPhone 6 plus and dad has a Galaxy Note phablet). Even then, they often need to zoom in to sites to read text or examine details. Now, as a designer I'm faced with a choice. I could use ...


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I always try to be conscious of how well my interfaces will be received to people who may have color blind issues. And also, I feel that making a page which is balanced for color blindness will also be easier on the eyes of users in general. Even if your eyes are perfect, looking at yellow text on a white background is going to be annoying. To balance this ...


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On average it takes roughly 12 seconds for an elevator door to close. If it has a sensor, and something interferes, the door will stop and open again. Doors for wheel chair bound patrons usually take a bit longer, maybe 15 seconds to open and close, and open in a sequence so as to keep out the heat of summer, or the cold of winter.


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Screen sizes on desktops might be getting bigger, but more than 50% of web usage is now through smart phones where real estate is at a premium. 2-column designs are impractical for phones, and people may want a consistent experience across multiple devices/screens (or as consistent as it can be)


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I think your question is why you don't see left-hand navigation by default any more. I'd say this mainly a trend--perhaps a good one. There are many trends these days and two of them are a) hamburger menus and b) single column page layouts. This article isn't in-depth, but one of many you can find out there that talk a bit more about this: ...


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I would suggest that horizontal text is more readable than text on separate lines. Read | This Sentence | Now | Please vs. Now Please Read This Sentence My eyes would rather move in a straight line than zig-zag.


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Every website has different needs, thus different approaches are perfectly acceptable. Ecommerce sites for example often have top AND left menus. Heck, some even have top, left and right. If you are going to a nice left menu because resolutions are giving you such nice real estate to work with, maybe make it responsive to jump back to a top menu for smaller ...


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This study http://uxpajournal.org/the-effects-of-parallax-scrolling-on-user-experience-in-web-design/ found that two of the users in the PS test group reported feeling motion sickness when using the parallax site. One user felt so nauseous that she had to cut short the time using the site. With this in mind, it's recommended that extensive testing is carried ...


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You can just provide an optimal contrast on the default layout of your interface. Also because a visual impaired user could have some difficulties in scan and find the high contrast icon. So you don't need a high contrast version. You should simply test the colours of text against the background (you can find many useful color pickers tools). Bear in mind ...


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My son, who is almost 5, has no visual problems but does have autism. He insists on having high-contrast mode for all his web activities and YouTube viewing. I didn't know it existed on the computer, but he found it, and every time I turn it off for my own use, he immediately turns it back on.


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Another perspective to this is that, light text requires the reader to think and therefore either a relaxed user will skip the content and an attentive user is likely to pay more attention. This unattractive colors are more likely to be a hit when the user is expected to pay attention



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