Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

You are correct. You should ignore the Technique 2.2.1 and only use Guideline 1.4.3. The reasons are as follows: Technique 2.2.1 is only a suggestion. As you point out, Technique 2.2.1 is “open to change.” It’s listed in a 14-year-old working draft that apparently hasn’t gone anywhere, and for good reason, as the remaining points will illustrate. ...


0

tl;dr: Time to dig out all those typography books again. ;) I've found that very dark gray text and a white background, or a black background and very light gray text is better than pure black and white. It maintains the contrast you're looking for without the stark contrast of a 100% black and white. Use a larger text size—at least 16px = 1em for body ...


4

Here are a few resources: Designing UI for Seniors - October 7, 2013 Usability for Senior Citizens - May 23, 2013 There are also a few questions on Quora(.com) that address this issue; search for 'core UX concerns'. In general, older people take longer to use computer technology, and need simpler designs. Make your UIs simple and have plenty of space, ...


0

Black text on a white background is universally more readable, and so is the best choice for an "older audience". The older the audience, the more appropriate larger text size and black text on white background. Consider that starting at age 35, this preference grows and grows, to age 80, at which point it is just the way to go with no exceptions. It's not ...


1

Who are your service's users? Have these people ever seen Markdown, BBCode or other text markup? If they have, you might be able to get away with using a markup language like Markdown. I would recommend there be a way for the user to preview the email output before they send it. A link to view a list of basic markdown formatting would be good too. ...


3

Ideally the content would be rendered in the site via good ole' HTML/CSS to be SEO-friendly, though nowadays Google is already also indexing alternate file formats like PDF and Doc. In terms of whether it's a good idea or not: The greatest problem in distributing Word documents is that doing so assumes that all recipients have Microsoft Word. In cases ...


1

Application designs that don't differentiate between active and inactive windows are violating the principles that: A. Recognition is more valuable then recall B. A system should inform the user about its state. C. The system should help prevent errors These are all Nielson classics. Showing the user what window is in focus prevents users from "typing ...


12

The study list linked to in the blog mentioned by Matt Obee is here http://dyslexiahelp.umich.edu/sites/default/files/good_fonts_for_dyslexia_study.pdf It's an interesting paper and the conclusions are worth working through: The main conclusion is that font types have an impact on readability of people with dyslexia. As they do on readability with ...


25

Italics are a known problem for some people with dyslexia and the general advice has been to avoid italics (particularly large blocks of italic text) and instead use bold for emphasis. The British Dyslexia Association says: Avoid underlining and italics: these tend to make the text appear to run together. Use bold instead. UX Movement touches on ...


0

Personally, I always include the search result count in the heading. Users navigating by outline/headings (a feature often offered by screen readers) get more, and possibly relevant, information before they have to jump to that section and start reading how many results there are. WCAG 2.0 The relevant guideline is 2.4.6 Headings and Labels (level AA): ...


0

Create jump to content links http://webaim.org/techniques/css/invisiblecontent/ Use proper HTML5 tags relevant to the content. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/19595719/html5-main-element-versus-aria-landmark-role-main Use Aria Landmark roles. http://a11yproject.com/posts/aria-landmark-roles/ More information on Aria attributes and usages ...


0

I assume the accessibility report is looking at that aspect only, as such it would be right, dynamic headers are not a good experience for screen readers as they use the H's to navigate. In addition to the above I'm going to reform my answer. It stands to reason that someone with impaired vision, using a screen reader would need the H tag to navigate, this ...


0

In my opinion it's really up to you as there isn't just one correct way. I would suggest one of the following: Using 3 drop-downs won't be the faster input method but it's reliable, understandable and partially validated since you exert control over the list of numbers contained in the menu itself. input type="date" should be fine as it is the standard for ...


1

Extension cords in the US have a ribbed side and a smooth side. This is to identify the hot wire in the circuit. This technology is already in place and is being used daily. It shouldn't be hard to modify the number of ribs to allow more than two options.


0

I prefer physically incompatibility. If all live wires were finished with a triangle, all neutral with a square, earth with a D etc. And all junction boxes, connectors etc appropriately shaped it would be extremely difficult to make a mistake. take putting petrol in a diesel car, with appropriately shaped nozzles and fillers this would be impossible. ...


2

After a good deal of thinking (partially inspired by PlasmaHH's comment) I came up a solution that would allow even the most visually impaired to identify wires. See this graphic: Using a combination of 2 wire colours, black and white (which are actually shades), plus 4 grey and opposite colour stripes, and a starting position indicator, a thin blue ...


5

Making a wiring system not depend on colour is easy. Making it cost effective is another question. The other answers have excellent ideas (bumps, labels etc) and they work fine in low-volume or custom installations like a datacenter, or ultra-high-cost products like commercial aircraft. Another way is to use a tracer. Telephone rooms have literally ...


1

I'm using high contrast because I spend a lot of my time on the computer using my eyes and by the end of the night they often feel very tired and sometimes they start to hurt a little and since I've switched to high contrast earlier today I've definitely felt a difference in my "eye strain" so my eyes definitely feel better after having spent so much time on ...


1

You are not the only person to have this difficulty, but barring a new specification from the NEC board, it's not something you can solve for in general. Electric wiring is definitely not a one size fits all problem. In domain specific situations, manufacturers, such as automakers and HVAC vendors, need to provide their own solutions. Some do this better ...


30

The UK plug uses 3 wires -- two of solid colour, and a third that is 2-coloured in a stripe pattern. The colours are chosen so that each wire can be identified by colour blind persons. Here is what the configuration looks to people with colour blindness: From MrReid: Under the IEC 60446 standard only black, brown, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, ...


0

Wires could have little bumps at the end of them (for wires that have an end point like lan cables) or in regular intervals (like every 5cm). Then just map number of bumps to colors. So e.g. 1 bumps = red, 2 bumps = blue, etc. This would of course work best if some kind of standard was developed and ideally enforced by law. As this is not likely to happen, ...


22

Color coding is one of the basic covenants of design and usability. To flaunt the significant benefits of color coding away purely on the varying needs of < 10% of the population would not be at all appropriate. There are multiple types of color blindness, so while one color might not work for some "color blind" people it will do just fine for the rest. ...


0

My vote for this Poll is no, color coding should not be outlawed. The reason for this is that although a user experience practitioners job is to seek out the most usable or accessible interface, product, or service, we are also required to try and meet user expectations. We have many different senses that designers can target as inputs or outupts for ...


1

Screen readers read from top to bottom, they generally split headlines and links into lists and have a top of page command (CMD CTRL + HOME) which is the same as the standard web short-cut buttons for accessibility. So you're right, making your top of page link is slightly redundant.



Top 50 recent answers are included