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(Ignoring the error your checking tool reported, which may or may not be an actual error.) If you want to state that the iframe content is not meaningful (i.e., only decorative/presentational), you could use the presentation role from WAI-ARIA. In HTML5, the iframe element can have one of these WAI-ARIA roles: application, document, img, presentation. As ...


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Most of the answers I see here are geared more toward print than the web. Reading printed materials is different than reading on the web. As far as text sizes go, instead of using fixed font sizes, you should always let users decide with defaults they have set in their browsers. 1.5 is a good, readable line height when reading text on a screen. This ...


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As far as browsers are concerned, the title of an iframe element <iframe title="Web Page Title"> is exactly the same as the title of any web page <head><title>Web Page Title</title></head> You can find the information you are seeking in the following thread. How should a website's title be structured?


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I am almost 71 and wear bi-focal glasses which I definitely need in order to be able to read either on or off the computer, and generally need for daily living as well). I prefer dark text (black or dark grey) on a light background (either white or an off-white (such as the colour of the 'Your Answer' pop-up that appeared as I started my answer.) I HATE ...


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Sometimes there are region specific acts that require certain accessibly standards to be met. For example, according to the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act as of January 1, 2014 in Ontario, Canada all websites must be WACG 2.0 Level A compliant. Additionally, by January 1, 2021, all websites must be Level AA compliant.


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If you look at the data points on high contrast reading studies what you notice is more veriability on the high constrast side of chart. You will also notice that readability is not significantly lower on high contrast side. What that mean is some people find high contrast much more readable. This suggests that some people are well adapted to high contrast ...


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This article answers this very well - [WEB AIM - Skip Navigation] Some key points: Providing visible links at the top of the page The key is to make sure the link is one of the first items that screen readers hear and that keyboard users tab to. Otherwise, users may not realize there is a "skip navigation" link there at all, and may waste time trying ...


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Design by the principle of least surprise. The user pressed the tab key 99.999% of the time this was not an error. So what do they expect? Consistency heuristic would guide that users expect same behaviour as their most familiar platform - if they actually know the behaviour in that platform. For something this subtle that would be the minority. User ...


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First off, for accessibility reasons it is really important that the Tab key instantly goes to the next item in a form (based on a Tab order that makes sense -- Left to Right, Top to Bottom) I know this isn't your question but I wanted to make sure people didn't suggest preventing the TAB key from registering or any such non-sense. If a combo box has focus ...


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You've listed two possible behaviors: mimicking an enter key or mimicking an escape key. Have you considered doing nothing at all? Just discard the keystroke as inappropriate for the particular control (combobox) in its current state (option-list-showing). As long as your combobox doesn't automatically show its option list when it gets the focus, then ...


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I'd suggest using a monospace font. It helps a lot with readability and they're usually made so you distinguish letters. Also, why discard numbers? I don't have a study to demonstrate that, but i think humans recognize faster the numbers.


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If the goal is to be read in a hurry, and accuratly, besides looking at excluding certain letters, I would agree with @J.Dimeo to use three-letter words. I would also look at possibly getting rid of three letter words that could be mis-typed easily on a mobile device, such as "BET" and "BEG". If you don't need a lot of randomness, this would be a great ...


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Working off a lot of the answers already given, what about randomly combining 3 3-letter words? http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:English_three-letter_words (taking out inappropriate ones for this purpose of course) Assuming: Your users are all English speakers You only need about ~3 million unique codes (150 * 150 * 150) I feel like "Don Gym Cob" ...


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Just to add on Tim Bakers excellent answer, There are actually recommendations on which characters are ambiguous letters so named since they may confuse users about whether they stand for a letter or a character. To quote an earlier answer I had posted sometime back You can get the list of those characters from this C code file on Pwgen. If you ...


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Some information is missing in your question, what length has the code to be? is it to be memorized? Instead to avoid confusable character you could generate pronounceable code wit Bubble Babble. The code would look like this xexax xesef-disof-gytuf-katof-movif-baxux xigak-nyryk-humil-bosek-sonax


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You may also be interested in the readability of the font your planning on using. There is some good research available in this white paper by MIT and others. They focus on the font characteristics of open shapes, ample character spacing, unambiguous forms and varying proportions to increase readability. ...


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I have used aria-label and aria-labelledby. Though i am not an expert in AX


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I think a lot of people are afraid of making things accessible because they don't know anything about it. To be honest, these days, it's really not that hard. With respect to vision and mobility impaired users, WAI-ARIA gives us a ton of tools that we didn't have 10 years ago that all modern browsers and screen readers support. You can make interactive ...


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accessibility is not a 1 thing. design for color impaired vision is pretty straight forward, can be done universally and benefits everyone if you rely too much on sound and voice overs, subtitles are your friend - not every office computer has loudspeakers even if people can hear without problems layout should look good when you change font size in the ...


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As a left-hander myself I don't really see the need for something like this. If I use any smartphone in landscape mode, I automatically (and so do most of my peers) use both hands and therefore able to touch whatever I want to more or less comfortably. So IMH-left-hander-O: don't worry about us left-handers, unless the app will usually be handled ...


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Interesting debate about the usage of <small>. Your usage of it may be correct, I have a feeling that SiteImprove is just mentioning it as a warning. However if you look up the w3 spec, they have examples of what footnotes should look like http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/common-idioms.html#footnotes Notice neither contained the <small> tag. My ...


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I use both hands with my phone and I cannot touch anything without occluding the think I want to touch regardless of which hand I use... So perhaps there is no problem at all? Also when I use the thumb of the hand holding the phone (anyone else ever held a shopping bag in their other hand?), sliding from the left side is more comfortable to do with my left ...


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There is no universal answer, because keyboards and other input tools vary so much. There is not a single character that can be assumed to be convenient to type. If we restrict ourselves to the use of keyboards based on the Latin alphabet, we can say that characters in the “invariant subset of Ascii” are probably easy to type. It includes basic Latin ...


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Depending on the type of service you are offering, I don't think there is anything that is "universal". It also depends on whether the user has access to a physical keyboard or not. A good rule of thumb is that if you find it hard to find a key, your user will also. One solution you could provide is a context menu of common characters above the text entry ...


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I am not sure if this answers your question, as it actually undermines it, but there are fare more studies on why proper capitalisation is prefered: ALL UPPERCASE IS HARDER TO READ Because Your Mind Doesn't Read Each Letter, Rather the Shape Of The Word Wichh Is Why You Can Do Tihngs Scuh As Tihs Why Capital Letters Are Dangerous (Guardian ...


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WAI-ARIA can be used to "convey user interface behaviors and structural information to assistive technologies in document-level markup". Have a look at the Live Region Attributes: aria-atomic Indicates whether assistive technologies will present all, or only parts of, the changed region based on the change notifications defined by the aria-relevant ...


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The golden question here is: "If a notification doesn't notify - is it still a notification?" :) My approach on this interesting problem would be to make a kind of a "silent notification" variation that could be activated in the settings or directly in the notification window. Something similar to "airplane mode" on a telefone. We can call it "library mode" ...



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