Hot answers tagged

89

Great question! This is an good case for microinteraction design. Microinteraction objectives In descending order of priority: Provide clear affordance for user to place card/wallet on reader Provide clear feedback that the user should hold the card on the reader until an outcome. Since this is public transportation, provide blind- and deaf- friendly ...


52

Well for your example of alt text just show him that there are many more benefits than accessibility. http://www.learnwebdevelopment.com/2011/01/advantages-to-adding-alt-tags-to-images/ Increases Traffic Higher SEO Rankings Safety Rules All of the reasons shown in this link (first link I found on google) are advantages that will increase ...


33

As the other answers said, the colours themselves may pose a problem if the hues aren't distinguishable easily. The clearest solution to this is to combine the colours with a shape, so full-vision people can still scan quickly by colour but stopping to look for a second will also easily show the idea. Something like: download bmml source – ...


30

A good example to consider would be the ibooks app in iOS which allows users to enable the dark theme automatically depending on the light sensor detection. However as PS86 rightly pointed out, dont build this automatically into the system but enable the user to set as a desired parameter. To quote this article, the ibook app enables this by an option ...


25

This is where I'd argue that UX isn't the one to fix this. All they can do is apply duct tape and band aids to a poorly implemented technology. Fix the technology. It simply shouldn't take 3 seconds to read an RFID chip. On top of that, asking each person to wait 3 seconds to pass through seems like a logistical nightmare for crowd management. This is ...


25

No, it would seem not, as W3C states 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum): The visual presentation of text and images of text has a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1, except for the following: (Level AA) Large Text: Large-scale text and images of large-scale text have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1; Incidental: Text or images of text that are part of an ...


18

In the Parliament of Ukraine they use both visual and audial means while voting, you can see youtube video (~10s). The sound consist of several tones which are percieved as the sequence, so stopping it somewhere in the middle sounds not natural. The row has some kind of harmony and natural feeling of the length. You could try to play some ~3s sound when ...


18

There are a couple of reasons: 1. Safety Have you ever tried climbing stairs covered in ice or rain, sometimes it can be rather slippery and dangerous, and those are on flat surfaces. Now try the same on an inclined ramp, the chances of sliding or falling down would be much greater. 2. Footprint Like you mentioned you can have stairs go up much quicker ...


17

Accessibility is the default position Creating something that helps as many people as possible is a primary goal of a UX designer. How can you improve someone's life with something they can't even access in the first place? You shouldn't have to argue the position of why your content should be accessible because it is up to others to defend the ...


13

As per the ADA guidelines,the recommendations for doors are Doors that snap closed quickly make it difficult for users, particularly those with disabilities, to get through safely. Doors with closers should take at least 5 seconds to move from the open position at 90 degrees to 12 degrees from the latch. Doors with spring hinges should take at ...


11

The XBox added a visual camera input device called the Kinect. They defined a number of gesture inputs, covered on the linked page and this one. This 2nd link includes the 'hold to select' gesture. Point the palm of your hand toward the screen, and move the on-screen hand over the item you want to select. To select an item, keep your hand over the item ...


10

Let's first start by taking a baseline: IE8. According to the stats from statcounter 4.12% still use IE8. This might be different from your target demographic, but at least it gives us a number to compare to. Next there are two types of handicaps that will cause problems interacting with typical webpages: vision and dexterity. Now, unlike what the current ...


10

Because you're legally required to Since you're in the US, the Americans with Disabilities Act applies to you. Your company is likely in breech of the law if it does not make the website accessible and there is are moves afoot to press enforcement of this issue. I also agree with the other answers but simple legal requirements are often the easiest ...


9

I just want to say that as a hard of hearing person, I am always confronted with situations where I am left out - I couldn't hear groups of people in the hallway in high school, I struggle to hear my family at Christmas dinner, and I've had university profs refuse to wear a microphone that would help me hear them. I find that I go through periods of ...


9

Deuteranopia, or red-green colorblindness, is one of the most common forms of colorblindness. There are many other forms of colorblindness that effect perception of red and green as well. Without access to the Google interface you referred to, I presume that there is nothing special about these colors that would provide additional assistance to colorblind ...


8

Users should be made aware of any data formatting constraints before they start typing. The best way to solve this is by visually and programatically incorporating these constraints into forms directly so: Users can 'see' the constraints so that they make correct entries in the first place System makes it nearly impossible for users to enter invalid data. ...


8

WCAG guideline 1.4.1 (Level A): 1.4.1 Use of Color: Color is not used as the only visual means of conveying information, indicating an action, prompting a response, or distinguishing a visual element. (Level A) So it is a clear violation of accessibility guidelines and you'll do well by providing additional visual cue that isn't colour-based. My ...


7

Dyslexia: colour and contrast The most important factor affecting people who suffer from dyslexia when it comes to colour is contrast: People who suffer from dyslexia find it difficult to read with high contrast levels, So While contrast can be provided by black text on a white background this is not so beneficial when considering Dyslexia. Research ...


7

You can start looking at existing systems in the public sector. Take for example pedestrian-crossing lights with a ticking sound for visually impaired people. It's a continuously ticking sound and it ticks fast enough to notice something is in progress. It can be a softer, shorter and different sound than the beep. For those who can't hear it can be combined ...


7

Adding to Alexey's great answer: You could have the reader play a sequence of tones in a scale that move toward a resolution; when the card is done reading, a resolving chord would play. This would make it even clearer that the reader is done, eliminating any doubt as to whether the sequence of notes is finished. I believe this could be done in such a way ...


7

Accessibility is more than accommodating people that can't use a mouse. It's also about people that prefer not to use a mouse. To give you a quick idea of these types of people: anyone with fine motor control restrictions. Parkinsons, severe arthritis, etc. Those with disabled hands/arms (war vets, accidents, etc.) anyone with large motor control issues ...


6

Yes, it's a good idea to dynamically change the theming of the application based on lighting. Also remember to add: the ability for the user to turn off dynamically changing the theme based on lighting The ability to change theme regardless of the current lighting ambience Sometimes users prefer having dark theme during the day and vice versa


6

I guess @Mervin Johnsingh has already answered it with the facts and figures. I just wanted to highlight my experience and my thoughts automatic doors(Sliding). If there is a automatic sliding door, one expects it to open at a safe distance without decreasing the speed of walking(with doubts in mind if its going to open or not) Similarly, when one enters ...


6

For stubborn business folks, I like to use an analogy of a brick and mortar store. Why should you pay for a wheel chair ramp? don't people with wheel chairs also have money and want to spend it in your shop? what about the mom pushing a stroller? This would probably make it easier to get into your shop to spend her money. that UPS guy...you're always mad ...


5

Hmmm take a look at this: https://github.com/filamentgroup/tablesaw As width is reduced, the table converts over into a listing. You do lose the ability to do row comparisons, but it does ensure data remains accessible for small screen sizes.


5

If you include the correct ID (unique name, used only on 1 set of input/label) for both elements, the order of elements doesn matter. Alternatively you can use aria to describe the input like this: <input aria-labelledby='id-of-my-label-located-elsewhere'>


4

I've been working with UX teams to help establish good practices with regards to including accessibility early on as well as documenting some issues in wireframes and designs. Matt Obee covered keys issues above. To his list I would also add: Structure: understand how the heading structure works on the page, where lists are, WAI ARIA Landmarks and data ...


4

Honestly, as long as your :hover state & :focus state are very clearly showing exactly which item will have action the taken on it, I can't see any reason to style them separately. :focus is essentially a keyboard hover. The previous answer is correct in saying that a :focus element should contain a box around it, but as long as the outline property ...


4

Audio only feedback - Play a rising tone that ends in a pleasant note when finished. Initially users would not know what the tone meant but once they use it the first time they will be trained. Or play a slightly annoying sound that ends once the card is read. Think like the scratchy changing sound of the geiger counter. Visual feedback - A single yellow ...



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