Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

102

As pointed out in comments and other answers, pointer trails were originally "intended for" and "especially useful if you [were] using a liquid crystal display (LCD) screen" in Windows 3.1. LCD monitors at the time were mostly passive-matrix, whose typically slower response times meant your cursor didn't have time to get redrawn as it moved across the ...


64

The original purpose of the "mouse trails" feature, according to the Windows 3.1 documentation, was to make the mouse easier to track on the very-high-latency LCD panels used in early laptops, by ensuring that the pointer was drawn in each position for at least a full refresh cycle of the screen. It turns out that it also makes the mouse easier to ...


55

No - there is no "friendly font" for all. Dyslexia is not a hard and fast condition. Different people who are dyslexic will exhibit differently. As a result a particular font that helps one individual does not necessarily help another. io9.com actually has a recent article which cited several studies on the subject: A Special Font to Help Dyslexics? More ...


31

The UK plug uses 3 wires -- two of solid colour, and a third that is 2-coloured in a stripe pattern. The colours are chosen so that each wire can be identified by colour blind persons. Here is what the configuration looks to people with colour blindness: From MrReid: Under the IEC 60446 standard only black, brown, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, ...


27

This conclusions from Michael Hughes might be helpful for you to decide when to include a screenshot and when not to: So where does this leave me? I am going to be more open to including screen shots where they do the following: Help reassure the user that where they are in the UI is the right place to be Help call attention to a specific ...


26

Italics are a known problem for some people with dyslexia and the general advice has been to avoid italics (particularly large blocks of italic text) and instead use bold for emphasis. The British Dyslexia Association says: Avoid underlining and italics: these tend to make the text appear to run together. Use bold instead. UX Movement touches on ...


23

Color coding is one of the basic covenants of design and usability. To flaunt the significant benefits of color coding away purely on the varying needs of < 10% of the population would not be at all appropriate. There are multiple types of color blindness, so while one color might not work for some "color blind" people it will do just fine for the rest. ...


19

Apart from the answer given, I would like to mention one very important Use Case where the solution is nothing BUT shadows. Text on an image When you don't have control over the image on top of which you are writing text, you have to ensure proper contrast for best readability. A Big hero Image seems to be rage these days. A dark shadow is added behind ...


13

I believe its because there are universally defined standards on where Braille letters have to positioned with regards to a informational item and braille users generally learn to look for them in one location. There are also classes conducted for people with visual disabilities which inform them where to look for the sign (the class is called Orientation ...


13

You need to clearly communicate in a non visual sense the fact that the menu has sub menu items. When thinking about the problem like this it turns out that you aren't restricted to just output text as you can also use the text in the tags and attributes. For visually impaired users you should be thinking in text, not images (this is actually very good ...


12

Marco Zehe, Mozilla accessibility QA engineer and evangelist, provided some advice in an article about implementing tabs in web apps with WAI-ARIA. He advocates cursor keys for moving focus between tabs in a set and then spacebar to activate the focused tab, which is consistent with the native desktop experience. Left and Right arrow keys should move ...


12

The study list linked to in the blog mentioned by Matt Obee is here http://dyslexiahelp.umich.edu/sites/default/files/good_fonts_for_dyslexia_study.pdf It's an interesting paper and the conclusions are worth working through: The main conclusion is that font types have an impact on readability of people with dyslexia. As they do on readability with ...


12

In some situations a drop shadow or stroke can be used to maximise accessibility and maintain the contrast ratio between text and the background. I have used this method once or twice when dealing with strict brand guidelines that demanded non-conforming colour combinations. It is mentioned as a technique for meeting the SC 1.4.3 (Contrast) criterion of ...


11

To me, the answer is yes, especially for dark themed sites. Here are some images from a site that I designed for my brother's roofing company. He wanted an all dark theme. So I gave him a dark gray background, some off white and gray body texts, all with darker CSS3 shadows. ( Small caveat: the images actually came out darker than the site actually is when ...


9

I am not sure if this answers your question, as it actually undermines it, but there are fare more studies on why proper capitalisation is prefered: ALL UPPERCASE IS HARDER TO READ Because Your Mind Doesn't Read Each Letter, Rather the Shape Of The Word Wichh Is Why You Can Do Tihngs Scuh As Tihs Why Capital Letters Are Dangerous (Guardian ...


9

I think a lot of people are afraid of making things accessible because they don't know anything about it. To be honest, these days, it's really not that hard. With respect to vision and mobility impaired users, WAI-ARIA gives us a ton of tools that we didn't have 10 years ago that all modern browsers and screen readers support. You can make interactive ...


9

The focus state should be more obvious than the hover state A mouse over or :hover state is a more direct interaction (i.e. the user is controlling the mouse cursor directly over the button they want to click) The :focus state, on the other hand, requires a separate scan of the entire page in order to determine which component is currently being targeted. ...


8

...to see if it is useful for our company to put some extra attention into our designs for those who are colourblind. It's not just colour-blind users who can't see certain colour combinations - actual blind people can't either, so you need to ensure data isn't represented purely visually. Webaim have some useful info on this topic that covers off the ...


8

There is actually research about this topic: http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/fulltext.cfm?uri=oe-6-4-81&id=63459 "Both text contrast and background contrast variation affect text readability. Background variation effects were only seen when the text contrast was low. Greater effects of background variation would be expected if larger background ...


8

Man, when you asked that question, I thought you meant a Web 1.x monstrosity. I'm not sure there's a hard and fast rule on this but, generally speaking, that's what we would call light noise. My concern wouldn't be with the level of contrast, but with looking somewhat dated. Basically, as soon as Apple declared skeuomorphism to be a thing of 2012 and thus ...


8

You are correct. You should ignore the Technique 2.2.1 and only use Guideline 1.4.3. The reasons are as follows: Technique 2.2.1 is only a suggestion. As you point out, Technique 2.2.1 is “open to change.” It’s listed in a 14-year-old working draft that apparently hasn’t gone anywhere, and for good reason, as the remaining points will illustrate. ...


8

Retype vs. summarize (a) If the entire text of the scan is relevant, the entire text should be provided in text form. (b) If only a certain part of the scanned text is relevant, only this part should be provided in text form. (It can have a summary in addition, as long as the relevant parts are quoted verbatim.) (c) If none of the scanned text is relevant ...


7

Definitely don't create a separate site. There are three points I think are critical to consider when it comes to inclusive design: Compliance with accessibility guidelines actually improves usability for the non-disabled (by 35% based on this source). Quite a few of the important guidelines also make business sense - either better SEO or a site that is ...


6

As the related question may come up, be aware of what your local government's laws are related to disabled persons. For example, the American's with Disabilities Act is: The ADA is one of America's most comprehensive pieces of civil rights legislation that prohibits discrimination and guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities ...


6

I'm surprised nobody has really asked why you need an icon like this. I've been in the 508 business for quite a while now and I can tell you that there's a LOT of things you can do on the web to make it just work for everyone. There doesn't need to be an entrance for normal people and a back door entrance for those who have disabilities. You shouldn't ...


6

You should use the screenshot in below case When you cant explain the screen in words properly i.e. if there are more similar option on the screen which might confuse the user. When user will get navigate from one screen to another screen which are non consistent i.e. major UI change or you are redirecting user to different application. Also, you ...


6

Given the examples you've given for gradual changes and Beta Version, I would say Beta Version makes more sense. I tend to see Beta Version as a good way to transition into a completely new design. This allows for the user to try to use the new design to do what they normally do but be able to fall back the previous version if they really need to or to ...


6

Dyslexia: colour and contrast The most important factor affecting people who suffer from dyslexia when it comes to colour is contrast: People who suffer from dyslexia find it difficult to read with high contrast levels, So While contrast can be provided by black text on a white background this is not so beneficial when considering Dyslexia. Research ...


5

I understand it's meaning but as you mentioned that icon looks more applicable for someone with a physical disability only. Specific uses of the International Symbol of Access include: Marking a parking space reserved for vehicles used by disabled people/blue badge holders Marking a vehicle used by a disabled person, often for permission to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible