Hot answers tagged

96

There is no problem to work as a UX/UI designer, as choosing color is just a minor part of the usability process. There are lots of other activities that the UX-er should do, like usability testing, checking analytics, conducting A/B tests, writing reports. Choosing color is more like visual designers work. People often are confused between the two ...


55

I've been doing front-end work for a decade, and I have deuteranopia or deuteranomaly (red-green color blindness). It has never been a problem. I largely rely on color codes and location/proximity on color picker UIs to identify colors. When doing a design from scratch, I will often look at pre-existing palettes for inspiration. I will also use an ...


51

Well for your example of alt text just show him that there are many more benefits than accessibility. http://www.learnwebdevelopment.com/2011/01/advantages-to-adding-alt-tags-to-images/ Increases Traffic Higher SEO Rankings Safety Rules All of the reasons shown in this link (first link I found on google) are advantages that will increase ...


38

No. Best practice is not to have a separate screen-reader version of the site. Suggesting you should have a screen-reader version of the site infers that your main site won't be. Which doesn't really make any sense, because a non-screen-reader optimised site would be one not built to proper HTML web standards. And why would you intentionally build a non-...


33

As the other answers said, the colours themselves may pose a problem if the hues aren't distinguishable easily. The clearest solution to this is to combine the colours with a shape, so full-vision people can still scan quickly by colour but stopping to look for a second will also easily show the idea. Something like: download bmml source – ...


29

No, it would seem not, as W3C states 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum): The visual presentation of text and images of text has a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1, except for the following: (Level AA) Large Text: Large-scale text and images of large-scale text have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1; Incidental: Text or images of text that are part of an ...


28

People with Parkinson Disease (or PD as it's also known) need special considerations as you correctly figured. However, keep in mind that most of those considerations are covered by special peripherals rather than specific UI. As a matter of fact, just following common WAI- ARIA guidelines is more than enough. Keep in mind that, like many people with ...


23

Limitations are limiting Everyone here is very nice, but they're dodging one important point: Being a color-blind UXD will limit your ability to be an all-in-one product designer. Everyone has their limits. Unlike you, I do not have a solid engineering background. I work closely with a software architect throughout the discovery phase of a product or ...


20

There are a couple of reasons: 1. Safety Have you ever tried climbing stairs covered in ice or rain, sometimes it can be rather slippery and dangerous, and those are on flat surfaces. Now try the same on an inclined ramp, the chances of sliding or falling down would be much greater. 2. Footprint Like you mentioned you can have stairs go up much quicker ...


17

Accessibility is the default position Creating something that helps as many people as possible is a primary goal of a UX designer. How can you improve someone's life with something they can't even access in the first place? You shouldn't have to argue the position of why your content should be accessible because it is up to others to defend the non-...


14

My father has late-stage PD and after watching him use his Mac for the last 15 years here are some thoughts in no particular order: Assume the user can't use both hands or combinations of keys. My father uses his non-dominant hand with a track-ball because it shakes less, but has to use the keyboard and click with the same hand. Try that one out yourself ...


13

Color blindness may hinder your ability to produce some visual designs and maybe some parts of a 'pretty' UI, as color goes a long way to aesthetic appeal, BUT, as a UX designer I would go so far as to say that you can use color blindness to your advantage. Around 8% of men and .5% of women are color blind, and as a UX designer, it is our job to make sure ...


11

I just want to say that as a hard of hearing person, I am always confronted with situations where I am left out - I couldn't hear groups of people in the hallway in high school, I struggle to hear my family at Christmas dinner, and I've had university profs refuse to wear a microphone that would help me hear them. I find that I go through periods of ...


11

Let's first start by taking a baseline: IE8. According to the stats from statcounter 4.12% still use IE8. This might be different from your target demographic, but at least it gives us a number to compare to. Next there are two types of handicaps that will cause problems interacting with typical webpages: vision and dexterity. Now, unlike what the current ...


11

Because you're legally required to Since you're in the US, the Americans with Disabilities Act applies to you. Your company is likely in breech of the law if it does not make the website accessible and there is are moves afoot to press enforcement of this issue. I also agree with the other answers but simple legal requirements are often the easiest ...


10

I worked with a front-end developer with color blindness in the past. It never was a problem. You may have to check if the used colors are good for the larger group of users, but every UI/UX professional should check how a design looks and works for all kinds of users. No difference in my opinion.


9

Deuteranopia, or red-green colorblindness, is one of the most common forms of colorblindness. There are many other forms of colorblindness that effect perception of red and green as well. Without access to the Google interface you referred to, I presume that there is nothing special about these colors that would provide additional assistance to colorblind ...


9

WCAG2.0 is the currently generally-accepted standard for accessibility. Section 508 compliance checklists also exist (http://www.section508.gov/summary-section508-standards) but may be outdated: the original 508 guidelines are comparatively vague, and were written before e.g. screenreaders could interpret javascript so are more restrictive than necessary. ...


8

Users should be made aware of any data formatting constraints before they start typing. The best way to solve this is by visually and programatically incorporating these constraints into forms directly so: Users can 'see' the constraints so that they make correct entries in the first place System makes it nearly impossible for users to enter invalid data. ...


8

WCAG guideline 1.4.1 (Level A): 1.4.1 Use of Color: Color is not used as the only visual means of conveying information, indicating an action, prompting a response, or distinguishing a visual element. (Level A) So it is a clear violation of accessibility guidelines and you'll do well by providing additional visual cue that isn't colour-based. My ...


8

You will be the most precious designer in your company! In my software project, I always struggle to find solid advice about color choices. There are many guidelines and tools to measure how accessible a certain palette is, but applying them is so tedious and explaining the results so difficult. Typically, what works well is to find a color-blind user and ...


8

Yes, the Equalities Act 2010 (previously the Disability Discrimination Act) is such a law in the UK. And it has been used before for prosecuting companies offering poor accessibility (generally for things like offers only being available to fully-sighted people who browse a website with mouse, so users with screenreaders, or only using keyboard can't ...


7

I worked with a UX designer with serious color blindness. We would decide the color palette together, then wireframe the product in grayscale. Then using color palette with lighter/darker colors from the palette works pretty harmonious.


7

I'm mildly red/green colorblind. As you're probably aware, about 9% of males have some degree of deuteranomaly. If that's your flavor of color blindness, you are absolutely an asset. Your first task is to become the local expert on accessibility, because that's part of UX design. Google 'WCAG 2.0'. https://www.google.com/search?q=wcag+2.0 Within that ...


7

I cannot answer #2, but I can take a stab at #1 with some explanation. Background The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 (the basis for Section 508 in the US, some international regulations, and the ADA guidelines that the DoJ has used in recent lawsuits) have some guidelines on this. Success Criterion (SC) 1.4.1: Use of Color: Color is ...


6

For stubborn business folks, I like to use an analogy of a brick and mortar store. Why should you pay for a wheel chair ramp? don't people with wheel chairs also have money and want to spend it in your shop? what about the mom pushing a stroller? This would probably make it easier to get into your shop to spend her money. that UPS guy...you're always mad ...


6

If you include the correct ID (unique name, used only on 1 set of input/label) for both elements, the order of elements doesn matter. Alternatively you can use aria to describe the input like this: <input aria-labelledby='id-of-my-label-located-elsewhere'>


5

The requirement for running pages without CSS enabled is there to ensure that your pages make sense when the user is reading them via a non-visual device such as a screen reader. The problem here is that some screen readers do actually read what is on the screen while some read the underlying HTML. The first kind usually produce a chaotic stream of garbage ...


5

From WCAG 2.0: https://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/visual-audio-contrast-text-presentation.html "1.4.5 Images of Text: If the technologies being used can achieve the visual presentation, text is used to convey information rather than images of text except for the following: (Level AA)" Customizable: The image of text can be visually ...


5

I think you should go a week or so using some of the peripherals that these patients would use. You probably know UX as you experience the web, but you should get to know the challenges that they face when they're not using a mouse and a screen. They might have a hard time reading on the screen because of the shaking, so maybe they use a screen reader with ...



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