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52

No - there is no "friendly font" for all. Dyslexia is not a hard and fast condition. Different people who are dyslexic will exhibit differently. As a result a particular font that helps one individual does not necessarily help another. io9.com actually has a recent article which cited several studies on the subject: A Special Font to Help Dyslexics? More ...


19

Apart from the answer given, I would like to mention one very important Use Case where the solution is nothing BUT shadows. Text on an image When you don't have control over the image on top of which you are writing text, you have to ensure proper contrast for best readability. A Big hero Image seems to be rage these days. A dark shadow is added behind ...


12

In some situations a drop shadow or stroke can be used to maximise accessibility and maintain the contrast ratio between text and the background. I have used this method once or twice when dealing with strict brand guidelines that demanded non-conforming colour combinations. It is mentioned as a technique for meeting the SC 1.4.3 (Contrast) criterion of ...


11

To me, the answer is yes, especially for dark themed sites. Here are some images from a site that I designed for my brother's roofing company. He wanted an all dark theme. So I gave him a dark gray background, some off white and gray body texts, all with darker CSS3 shadows. ( Small caveat: the images actually came out darker than the site actually is when ...


7

Definitely don't create a separate site. There are three points I think are critical to consider when it comes to inclusive design: Compliance with accessibility guidelines actually improves usability for the non-disabled (by 35% based on this source). Quite a few of the important guidelines also make business sense - either better SEO or a site that is ...


5

Yes, the cost of building two web sites is typically higher than building one correctly in the first place. Would creating an inclusive website actually take away the full experience from 'normal' users while not creating a website specifically based on the needs of 'disabled' users? First of all, accessibility isn't about 'normal' vs. 'disabled' ...


4

This isn't really a framework issue as much as an overall corporate process issue. The bigger the organization, the more documentation and details it tends to require (which is antithetic to the agile process, but I digress...) That said... I am thinking of defining different components of this framework by establishing patterns in areas such as ...


3

It can, by increasing the contrast between the text and the background, which is its primary purpose. jsFiddle for actual demo ...


3

Separate is not equal It would be better to build a fully inclusive website, by suggesting a separate site that caters for accessibility issues for compliance makes the people who own the website sound like it is not an important issue and actually marginalising those people. Some key reasons why you should have only one website: You have a user ...


2

Parallax effects, particularly scrolling text and background solid bars over slower-scrolling or stationary background photos, make me feel queasy in the eyes, sort of like someone put my eyes in a cocktail shaker, shook them, then put them back in my head. This effect lasts for perhaps an hour after viewing the page. That's probably not how you want people ...


2

I think this is debatable. In my experience, some screen reader users might benefit from having the units ("per week") in each table cell because it can be mentally taxing to cross-reference the data in a cell against information provided separately. It's better to have that extra verbosity for the avoidance of doubt, even if it is a little repetitive. That ...


1

Text shadows can make text pop but do not make text more readable. I'll concede that adding text shadows around white text on a white background will make the text more readable since anything is more readable than invisible. I disagree, however, that using text shadows around black text on a white background is more readable than simply black text on a ...


1

I don't know which fonts are best, but I would recommend trying out a few with the person affected. I have had a some experience working with dyslexics and found trying different coloured papers to print on very effective. Blue was often found to improve visibility.


1

Apparently this is a limitation of WAI-ARIA live regions. @rathernerdy That’s an inherent limitation. There’s no way to buffer or stack them directly. You’ll have to get creative.— WebAIM (@webaim) January 20, 2015 One potential approach I found is to stack the messages in javascript, and append to a container all at once. With logic, you can ...


1

Have you tried using focus to direct user attention? Assistive technologies will let them know if an element has been given that focus (the same way they press tab to navigate - and focus on - each link on a page). You need to use javascript to make this work, triggering the .focus() method when the link is clicked on. It is very similar to how "Skip to ...



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