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Tricky question. I wouldn't really think of it in terms of percentage / number though, but more of a general target audience. Who is the target audience of the site? What sort of website is it? In most cases, aiming for AAA is overkill and (dare I say it) unnecessary. The majority of the AAA criteria relates to multimedia content and being able to serve that ...


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Cynthia Brewer has done a great deal of work in color arrangements, namely for cartography, which can take color blindness into consideration. She has a website which allows you to select from several parameters, including color blindness, to create a limited set of colors for multiple situations: ColorBrewer. The color selection is put in the context of ...


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Warning Your question can't be answered unless you know your audience. This means you need the actual data from your users. Of course, I'm not just going to say that without giving you some type of estimate--but you should know this is highly inaccurate compared to actual statistics for your website. Global Statistics Blindness If we want to ...


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Nice question. Design priorities can help a lot here. Let's say your priorities are (descending order): Communicate the chart lines clearly Make it color-blind friendly Avoid using boring color palettes Here's how I might design for these priorities (you'll have to pick your own way): #1: Use solid, bold, colorful lines for the data, fade the axes ...


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A quick Google search led me to this informative article about colorblindness. You might want to have a look at UX Question, Testing for Colorblind people This will give you resources to make sure you are taking care of color deficiencies. In addition to this question, there are chrome extensions (like Spectrum, see) to simulate color deficiencies. The ...


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It is interesting to me that the problem with large multi-column tables is not being solved by creating better content and information architecture, because regardless of how responsive or accessible the table is the information is still going to be unusable to the reader if there is simply too much information. The question of how to fit a large amount of ...


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Hmmm take a look at this: https://github.com/filamentgroup/tablesaw As width is reduced, the table converts over into a listing. You do lose the ability to do row comparisons, but it does ensure data remains accessible for small screen sizes.


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"But, it's more expensive if we try to reach the highest level" It shouldn't be. If it is, it likely means you're doing a whole lot of retrofitting of poor content and markup. Remodeling a house that is falling down is always more expensive than building a new solid one from the start. Keep in mind that WCAG specs are guidelines. Not magical levels ...


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I know you said you've used Color Brewer before, but you might also consider downloading Color Oracle. It's a program that was developed by Bernhard Jenny and Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso, both of whom are rockstars in the Cartography world. The program is designed to show you how a colorblind person would see your plots. So if you determine the best color ...


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There is really no definite answer as to whether the border should be 1px or 2px. You will need to make a judgement as to how thick the border needs to be in order for it to change the shape of the field sufficiently to differentiate it from other fields (I doubt 1px would be noticeable though.) However, how are you identifying the invalid fields for people ...


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Put a "Skip Navigation"or "Skip to main content" Links first element before every thing on top of your pages. So the keyboard user will decide to let screen reader go through all navigation and other stuff or just skip to go to the main content. so you can use visuallyhideen class to make the link invisible for sighted people. ...



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