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47

Well for your example of alt text just show him that there are many more benefits than accessibility. http://www.learnwebdevelopment.com/2011/01/advantages-to-adding-alt-tags-to-images/ Increases Traffic Higher SEO Rankings Safety Rules All of the reasons shown in this link (first link I found on google) are advantages that will increase ...


16

Accessibility is the default position Creating something that helps as many people as possible is a primary goal of a UX designer. How can you improve someone's life with something they can't even access in the first place? You shouldn't have to argue the position of why your content should be accessible because it is up to others to defend the ...


10

Let's first start by taking a baseline: IE8. According to the stats from statcounter 4.12% still use IE8. This might be different from your target demographic, but at least it gives us a number to compare to. Next there are two types of handicaps that will cause problems interacting with typical webpages: vision and dexterity. Now, unlike what the current ...


9

Because you're legally required to Since you're in the US, the Americans with Disabilities Act applies to you. Your company is likely in breech of the law if it does not make the website accessible and there is are moves afoot to press enforcement of this issue. I also agree with the other answers but simple legal requirements are often the easiest ...


9

There are a couple of reasons: 1. Safety Have you ever tried climbing stairs covered in ice or rain, sometimes it can be rather slippery and dangerous, and those are on flat surfaces. Now try the same on an inclined ramp, the chances of sliding or falling down would be much greater. 2. Footprint Like you mentioned you can have stairs go up much quicker ...


8

I just want to say that as a hard of hearing person, I am always confronted with situations where I am left out - I couldn't hear groups of people in the hallway in high school, I struggle to hear my family at Christmas dinner, and I've had university profs refuse to wear a microphone that would help me hear them. I find that I go through periods of ...


5

For stubborn business folks, I like to use an analogy of a brick and mortar store. Why should you pay for a wheel chair ramp? don't people with wheel chairs also have money and want to spend it in your shop? what about the mom pushing a stroller? This would probably make it easier to get into your shop to spend her money. that UPS guy...you're always mad ...


4

The requirement for running pages without CSS enabled is there to ensure that your pages make sense when the user is reading them via a non-visual device such as a screen reader. The problem here is that some screen readers do actually read what is on the screen while some read the underlying HTML. The first kind usually produce a chaotic stream of garbage ...


4

Scrolling pattern and navigation largely depends on the information architecture and content strategy of your website. The page scroll UI pattern has been largely used to showcase features of a product and I think it has been misused in this way. In most cases, the features are not peers but are related/dependent on each other. It seems page section ...


2

The answer to this question is simple, and is the answer for pretty much any "why don't we do it this way" question: You should do what makes sense for your users to digest your content in the most effective way. This may mean a left-hand nav for your app, but a one-size-fits-all model will not be effective for all users across all applications. Your best ...


2

Accessible checkboxes usually require two operations to control: first the user needs to 'focus' the checkbox (usually by using the 'tab' key to move through the interface until they reach the right control) and then they need to change the state of the checkbox (usually using the 'space' key). Sighted users will skip through the page using visual cues such ...


2

David Mulder and Das Beasto have some really good information in there. In response to one comment, the difference in their numbers is because Das Beasto (via Microsoft) is referring to "difficulties" while David Mulder is referring to specific disabilities. For example, someone with dyslexia, or color blindness, or who is simply very myopic has a visual ...


1

Wow. I can't even reply to comments to my own response until I get 50 rep points? Talk about usability... @aames, all good questions. I fully understand the situation with your code base. Having worked at Salesforce in both a UX and Dev capacity, particularly around accessibility, I know what it's like dealing with legacy code and developers who don't ...


1

Andrew is exactly right (I can't comment yet, not enough rep points). The idea of CSS disabled is not meant as an actual browsing experience but to ensure that your content makes sense semantically and in the order it's presented because that's how, the better, screen readers evaluate the content. On the idea that the same group suggesting display:none is ...


1

Short answer (and to avoid delving into how you are planning to parse content on your website) is yes it does - http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/ensure-compat.html If the Assistive Technology can't interpret your content correctly when Javascript is turned off on your page (or the web browser being used doesn't support Javascript) then it would not ...


1

I think you can find many references for technology or ideas that were originally conceived to make things more accessible, and in the end they have become mainstream because of the benefit it provides not only to handicapped users, but the general public as a whole. In fact, these days it is preferable to think about inclusive design, which incorporates ...


1

Check OpenAjax. Here you can find an example of how an accessible slider widget: http://www.oaa-accessibility.org/example/32/ Basically, you can say your slider component is accessible if every user can complete the task of picking values from a range. To summarize, what you should add to your components is: Labels and descriptions: Users with blindness ...


1

Many modern website designs that eschew vertical left navigation menus use one or more of the following instead: Hidden hamburger menus Simple horizontal navigation at the top of the page Long single-column content Targeted call-to-action buttons Those design decisions help maintain focus on the content and allow each page to deliver information with a ...



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