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82

Great question! This is an good case for microinteraction design. Microinteraction objectives In descending order of priority: Provide clear affordance for user to place card/wallet on reader Provide clear feedback that the user should hold the card on the reader until an outcome. Since this is public transportation, provide blind- and deaf- friendly ...


23

This is where I'd argue that UX isn't the one to fix this. All they can do is apply duct tape and band aids to a poorly implemented technology. Fix the technology. It simply shouldn't take 3 seconds to read an RFID chip. On top of that, asking each person to wait 3 seconds to pass through seems like a logistical nightmare for crowd management. This is ...


18

In the Parliament of Ukraine they use both visual and audial means while voting, you can see youtube video (~10s). The sound consist of several tones which are percieved as the sequence, so stopping it somewhere in the middle sounds not natural. The row has some kind of harmony and natural feeling of the length. You could try to play some ~3s sound when ...


11

The XBox added a visual camera input device called the Kinect. They defined a number of gesture inputs, covered on the linked page and this one. This 2nd link includes the 'hold to select' gesture. Point the palm of your hand toward the screen, and move the on-screen hand over the item you want to select. To select an item, keep your hand over the item ...


7

You can start looking at existing systems in the public sector. Take for example pedestrian-crossing lights with a ticking sound for visually impaired people. It's a continuously ticking sound and it ticks fast enough to notice something is in progress. It can be a softer, shorter and different sound than the beep. For those who can't hear it can be combined ...


7

Adding to Alexey's great answer: You could have the reader play a sequence of tones in a scale that move toward a resolution; when the card is done reading, a resolving chord would play. This would make it even clearer that the reader is done, eliminating any doubt as to whether the sequence of notes is finished. I believe this could be done in such a way ...


6

Accessibility is more than accommodating people that can't use a mouse. It's also about people that prefer not to use a mouse. To give you a quick idea of these types of people: anyone with fine motor control restrictions. Parkinsons, severe arthritis, etc. Those with disabled hands/arms (war vets, accidents, etc.) anyone with large motor control issues ...


4

Audio only feedback - Play a rising tone that ends in a pleasant note when finished. Initially users would not know what the tone meant but once they use it the first time they will be trained. Or play a slightly annoying sound that ends once the card is read. Think like the scratchy changing sound of the geiger counter. Visual feedback - A single yellow ...


1

As users are likely not used to technology working this slowly, the best system may be one that uses a combination of methods to help guide them to using the system correctly. However, (as other answers have shown) it's difficult to convey "waiting" through a static visual aid alone, and it may be too costly to add a screen conveying proper use. I think ...



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