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28

People with Parkinson Disease (or PD as it's also known) need special considerations as you correctly figured. However, keep in mind that most of those considerations are covered by special peripherals rather than specific UI. As a matter of fact, just following common WAI- ARIA guidelines is more than enough. Keep in mind that, like many people with ...


13

My father has late-stage PD and after watching him use his Mac for the last 15 years here are some thoughts in no particular order: Assume the user can't use both hands or combinations of keys. My father uses his non-dominant hand with a track-ball because it shakes less, but has to use the keyboard and click with the same hand. Try that one out yourself ...


9

WCAG2.0 is the currently generally-accepted standard for accessibility. Section 508 compliance checklists also exist (http://www.section508.gov/summary-section508-standards) but may be outdated: the original 508 guidelines are comparatively vague, and were written before e.g. screenreaders could interpret javascript so are more restrictive than necessary. ...


8

Yes, the Equalities Act 2010 (previously the Disability Discrimination Act) is such a law in the UK. And it has been used before for prosecuting companies offering poor accessibility (generally for things like offers only being available to fully-sighted people who browse a website with mouse, so users with screenreaders, or only using keyboard can't ...


5

I think you should go a week or so using some of the peripherals that these patients would use. You probably know UX as you experience the web, but you should get to know the challenges that they face when they're not using a mouse and a screen. They might have a hard time reading on the screen because of the shaking, so maybe they use a screen reader with ...


4

No, alts tags are invalid attributes on <a> tags (i.e. hyperlinks). W3 <a> tag specification : Global attributes href target download rel hreflang type and under "W3 Global Attributes" you get: accesskey class contenteditable dir hidden id lang spellcheck style tabindex title ...


3

Mouse-click is always better than mouse-hover, because mouse-click allows you to support all keyboard users, those who may or may not need accessibility support. It also helps you transition to touch-based devices like Tablets and Smartphones where you don't use a mouse, i.e. tap triggers the mouse-click. So benefits all round when you use mouse-click and ...


2

The most common level of WCAG adherance is AA, which does not require some of the things you were likely initially turned off by. Using your example, WCAG 2.0 AA does require closed captioning on videos, but does not require a sign language interpretation. To learn more on your own, consider an online course. I can personally recommend the courses from Deque ...


2

You mentioned you are a novice developer. In addition to the other great answers I want to answer on that perspective. HTML and CSS are designed with accessibility in mind. Making good use of them is the first step. It's not just about following W3C guidelines but also understanding them. Understand the semantics of HTML elements, learn about aria ...


2

Keep in mind that the best way to ensure that you meet accessibility requirements is not to simply run through a checklist of criteria that are mostly based on technical implementation details. WCAG 2.0 guidelines were very specific about doing 'human' testing to ensure that the site does more than just meeting technical specifications because it is only ...


2

You could have a "More details" button/link that opens a modal window with additional fields. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Clicking on "More details" would open a popup similar to the one below. download bmml source


1

What is shocking in your design is that 40% of the space is taken by action button and not by the main information. The buttons are taking to much space. Promote the content, not the tools. Some icons are very generic and don't need explanation. I don't speak Arabic but I can tell that the first button is "edit", second is "print", third "validate", fourth ...



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