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145

Most of the other answers here seem to be focusing on accessibility, which is fine, but is hardly the point. Screen readers are what? Less than 5% of the market for a general website? The reason "Here" and "Click Here" are bad is because they are useless words. They provide no context. This isn't an accessibility issue; it is a usability issue. There's an ...


116

When links were new (think 1995), designers felt that it was necessarily to let people know that something was a link by saying "here". I'm not sure if it was ever necessary, but it is not necessary now. When people see text formatted as a link, they know it's a link. Using "here" as the link text gives no context (which is especially bad for screen ...


49

One aspect of this is accessibility. You don't get any context from the link itself. You can see further info on wc3: http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere: When calling the user to action, use brief but meaningful link text that: provides some information when read out of context explains what the link offers -doesn't talk about ...


36

It emphasizes the wrong part of the text, like this. Links tend to be visually distinctive, and draw the eye. (Less so now that they're not underlined in most cases.) But the 'here' is the least important part of the text, really, and so the link disrupts the reading flow.


36

If you consider ergonomics and safety a part of User Experience, which I think it is, then yes - staircases have User Experience. Technically this means that there is relation between tread depth and rise height which, combined, is the pitch line. The angle of that pitch line should be about 30 deg and you have min-max values of both rise and height. ...


36

1. What if the user doesn't have a keyboard? It's a perfectly valid case. Not only some forms doesn't require interaction with a keyboard (for example a form with a couple of combo boxes, radio buttons and checkboxes), but even if the form has textboxes and textareas, it doesn't mean that at the exact moment of form submission, the user is ready to use her ...


32

I cannot understand why you'd want a reduced click area for your form field. Including the "for" attribute on the label tag allows you to increase the clickable area. It has been a web standard for quite a while and I would think most users are used to the behavior at this point, making it a convention. While it may not be a convention in software, I would ...


31

Darker color scheme are often used effectively in software that focuses heavily on visual content. For example Adobe Lightroom, Adobe After Effects, Microsoft Expression Blend, and Kaxaml are are interfaces that have a dark color theme. This allows the interface to fade into the background and let the content come alive Why is it not widely used? I guess it ...


27

I would say that a "Print" link is hardly ever necessary, even for content rich websites. You can use print styles in your CSS to have things render differently for print without creating a separate URL. My general rule is that if the browser can do something, there's almost never a reason to duplicate that with something on your page. The only times ...


23

You should use an empty alt attribute for images that are purely decorative. I'd argue that in the example you gave it is worth supplying an alt attribute that describes the image e.g. alt="Portrait of Jane Doe". @KitGrose mentions that including this text will also make the image searchable to image search engines such as Google Image. I reserve empty alt ...


23

It's not the end of the world if you skip headings in this manner because users will most likely still find the content, but it does go against the general structure of the content and adds a bit of a barrier to users accessing using assistive technologies. One way to look at it is to think of a trio of military chaps in a room; a General, a Sargent, and a ...


20

Dark on light vs light on dark themes can have multiple affects, such as: Bringing attention to an application vs bringing attention to the application's contents People focus on brighter areas - darker background brings attention to the content, while lighter background bring attention to the window itself vs the desktop. Imagine if the box around ...


20

It is not so clear for people using screen readers. Often all the text is read out first followed by a list of all the hyperlinks. If the hyperlinks are just named things like 'Click Here' then there is no context as to what that link is for. However if it is named 'Full McGuffin product spec' then there is no ambiguity.


19

The symbol you mention is actually the international symbol of access. It's been around since the late sixties, and it is used to indicate that access has been improved, particularly for wheelchair users, but also for other disability users. Take a gander here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Symbol_of_Access If you start using different signs ...


18

I think of this more as a mental model issue. Imagine if there was no mouse, but rather you were doing it with your hand. Most people are right-handed. My mental model is that I am moving the scrollbar with my right hand. Therefore, scrollbar on the left would indicate that my arm is moving across (in front of) the content and blocking my vision so I can ...


18

When the user clicks to play, you simply overlay a message saying 'This video has no sound', and the user clicks to accept this and start the video. For example, this recent video on the BBC website: In addition, where there may be sound but no voice-over, and the user might be expecting it, your message would be 'There is no commentary on this video'. ...


16

There's a spectacularly cool desktop app for Windows, Mac and Linux called Color Oracle which is really nifty and adjusts everything you see to mimic many various types of colour blindness in real time and isn't limited to static images or websites. Here are some screenshots showing the UX website under Deuteranopia, Protanopia and Tritanopia respectively: ...


14

This is a widely debated subject. One of the best ways I've seen this explained, is from the presentation Design for developers: making your frontends suck less by Idan Gazit. This had the following slide: This is 16pt text on a normal screen, and 12pt text in a book. The message is that 12pt is excellent for a book, but is also usually held much closer to ...


14

I must say that it is a design decision I like to go with in most projects. Regardless of the SEO benefits, having full navigation available in a consistent area of the site, always within reach of the user regardless of where they are in the site is certainly a benefit. It shouldn't replace standard navigation methods, but compliment them. I do not believe ...


14

Talking ATMs were created explicitly for use by the blind. In the United States the Americans with Disabilities Act now includes explicit regulations for talking ATMs. The ATMs near you may be different, but in the US and other countries it may be a requirement that ATMs have to be usable by the blind.


14

There are no rules, at least no hard and fast ones. Following research to the letter can result in making an ugly site--blue links work best, but blue links on a red background are hard to read! The research however can guide you to the "best practices" and your maintain your sense of good aesthetics so you know when to break from convention. While there ...


14

Research generally suggests light on dark is harder to read in most cases but considering we're talking accessibility, you should know that results for those with normal vision don't necessarily hold true for those with various vision impairments. I've heard higher contrast (the mode in Windows is called High Contrast mode I think) can be easier to read ...


14

You want to look to sites such as W3.org for advice on this. Many people with cognitive disabilities have trouble tracking lines of text when a block of text is single spaced. Providing spacing between 1.5 to 2 allows them to start a new line more easily once they have finished the previous one. The W3C accessibility guidelines 1.4.8 state (emphasis ...


13

why this color scheme is not widely used? Good question without an obvious answer. You could claim all sorts of trends are involved, but I think it would be a brave move to accept any one reason for why we tend to go with dark on light. I think your best bet is to develop the scheme that best suits your site's purpose and its users. For a quick ...


13

Those 'others' are incorrect. This is the intention of the HTML label tag and the proper implementation. Aside from the accessibility necessity, it's also a huge UX benefit especially with things such as checkboxes, where it's usually easier to hit the label than the tiny checkbox. If these 'others' hate it, tell them to stop clicking on the labels. ;)


12

Only physical devices should be affected by whether the person using them is right handed or left handed, for example mice. A touch screen is one area where you might want to consider such things, as you have considerations of the person's hand physically blocking the view. When relating to regular site and applications, the right (pun intended) question ...


12

Somewhat related to Dan Barak's answer, I find it worth noting, that a touchscreen device - especially a mobile, one-hand operated touchscreen device - is not always operated by means of the user's dominant hand (Silfverberg et al. 2000). Approximately 93% of the population are right-handed. Furthermore, there is a certain physical dimension not to be ...


12

In Designing for Senior Citizens | Organizing Your Work Schedule (UXmatters, 2010), several "experts" including Dana Chisnell, Steve Baty, and Pabini Gabriel-Petit discuss the issue of designing for senior citizens. The article references original sources at the end. Specifically, they mention legibility through color and typography usage. They mention ...


12

You're in luck. There are a number of websites that do this. Here are two I use: http://www.vischeck.com/vischeck/vischeckURL.php -- tests any website you point it at. You could take a snapshot and put it on a webserver. (I don't think it'll work with the Processing applet.) http://colorfilter.wickline.org/ -- similar idea, with even more options.


12

I believe its because there are universally defined standards on where Braille letters have to positioned with regards to a informational item and braille users generally learn to look for them in one location. There are also classes conducted for people with visual disabilities which inform them where to look for the sign (the class is called Orientation ...



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