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What's best icon for cancel, delete and close? (i want define 1 icon per situation in my application)

  1. http://i.stack.imgur.com/iVDr5.png
  2. http://i.stack.imgur.com/GS0AN.png

    • i found 1,2 is cancel action what's different between 1,2? / or \ is right?
  3. http://i.stack.imgur.com/uw5Aa.png

  4. http://i.stack.imgur.com/GjK9w.gif
  5. http://i.stack.imgur.com/1EUkb.png
  6. http://i.stack.imgur.com/xjOR9.png

I have screen shot for use delete and cancel edit action enter image description here

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closed as not constructive by Benny Skogberg, JonW May 19 '12 at 9:42

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
This is a graphic design question really as there's no other context or use case information provided in order to say whether one is more suitable for your situation than another, but I'd go for number 5 out of those options. –  Roger Attrill Jul 26 '11 at 10:33
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To clarify - you want one common icon to act for all three situations - cancel + delete + close? –  Roger Attrill Jul 26 '11 at 12:47
    
Without knowing the context of the action and the interface you are using it on it is not possible to give you a qualified answer. Can you post some screenshots? –  Katie C Jul 26 '11 at 14:07
    
@3iscuit Welcome to UX Stack Exchange. To reply to someone, put an @ before their name at the beginning of your comment. That way they'll be notified of the reply. –  Patrick McElhaney Jul 27 '11 at 12:57
2  
As Katie said, we can't give you useful answers without more context. Can you elaborate on what you mean by "what's different between 1,2? / or \"? Our FAQ also has advice on what makes a good question. Because it's not really answerable in its current form, I'm closing the question for now. If you decide to make improvements, let me know with an @ reply and we'll consider re-opening it. –  Patrick McElhaney Jul 27 '11 at 13:11
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It all depends on situation...

1, 2 — "No", "cancel"
4 — "Stop", may be used in alerts
5, 6 — "Delete", "cancel" if placed near some action, or "close" if placed on top corner of ui element.

Also minus icon is great for remove action.

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He wants one common icon for all actions... –  Jørn E. Angeltveit Jul 26 '11 at 11:30
    
Yes - one common icon for all three was my interpretation of the bit in square brackets, but I might be wrong - its not that clear from the English. I'll ask to make sure. –  Roger Attrill Jul 26 '11 at 12:45
    
What's different between 1,2? –  3iscuit Jul 27 '11 at 3:28
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That's actually a question for google:

-> Delete

-> Cancel

-> Close

As you can see from the results, there is no real difference between the icons used for these actions (except maybe the trash can for delete).

Solution: Always use text with the icon (or use text only). The only exception I can think of is when the action is obvious from the context (like the close button on the top right or left of a window/dialog).

Hope that helps, Phil

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why we use icon and text? Is it duplicate? –  3iscuit Jul 27 '11 at 9:32
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@3iscuit: Not many icons are understood by all users and usually don't enhance usability. I'd recommend to read this: uxmyths.com/post/715009009/myth-icons-enhance-usability –  Phil Jul 27 '11 at 13:00
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And to the person who downvoted: A comment would be appreciated. –  Phil Jul 27 '11 at 13:01
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