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Im designing a home insurance transactional journey (what the user sees after they select 'get a quote' from the product page).

Should my x4 page journey (enter details, get quote, buy quote, view policy) have a page footer or could this just distract users from the current journey of buying home insurance by bringing them outside this journey?

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What would this footer contain? Just a solid visual line, or links to things? Or textual information? A footer isn't just one type of thing; it could be anything. –  JonW Apr 3 at 9:43
    
I think at a minumum the footer would contain - contact details, social details, t&c's... –  Anon Apr 3 at 10:23

3 Answers 3

I would imagine that after you get a quote you might want to have the option to link to other things. Not everyone will immediately continue to buy, and they might leave the site entirely if you don't provide links to other parts of your site at this point. If the goal is keeping the user, then saving their progress and allowing them to come back to it at a later point might be a better strategy than locking it down.

I would say that you should test a few different versions with some target users and see how they respond.

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With a product like insurance, where legalities, details, fine print, and frequently asked questions are commonplace, a footer with links to such things enhances the experience without distraction.

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How does it enhance the experience? –  JonW Apr 3 at 22:46
    
I'd agree with this one. Google improves the pagerank to those sites that include Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions, since they believe it reassures users that they are being serious about their business (not the people but the sites). Failed to find a link though... –  edgarator Oct 31 at 5:52

Google Adwords' policies read:

Clear, accessible disclosure before visitors submit personal information

Our existing policy requires you to clearly describe how any personal information you solicit will be used. Soon, we’ll require that your description must also be easily accessible before site visitors submit their details.

And they do this to enhance the "Landing Page" experience.

Have a look at this other quote from Google.

Transparency and trustworthiness

  • Make it easy for visitors to find your contact information.

  • If you request personal information from customers, make it clear why you’re asking for it and what you’ll do with it.

  • Distinguish sponsored links, like ads, from the rest of your site content.

  • Openly share information about your business and clearly state what your business does.

In general terms, they suggest that by having that information accessible through your website you'll enhance the user experience. Now, I don't know about you, but I'd be kind of worried to leave my information in a website when I don't know how they are going to use it. If it worries you that the user might get distracted, make those link pop-over so that they can easily return to their workflow.

It is my opinion, based on the above, that you should include the footer.

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