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Our earlier website was an old school design with window size fixed pages with a lot of unnecessary content. We shifted to a one page website. We aim at acquiring leads for business through the site. However, the number of leads generated has gone down significantly after we shifted to one page site. One reason, as a product manager, I could think of was the form which is filled by the users. In the earlier site, the form was open on all the pages, but on the current one page site, its on the click of a button. Is there any best practice/good way of showing the form on one page sites? Kindly help!

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4 Answers 4

Since there is good screen estate and it is your main call to action why don't you try something like

enter image description here

Kindly ignore the artifact, my emphasis is on the positioning. This will intuitively draw a lot of attention to your CTA. If I have understood correctly Paul has also talked about positioning it in a similar fashion.

Moreover as you move down in the site you can probably dock it on the top with the menu (the red one on the top right corner) so that no matter where the user is on the page there is always an option to go to your contact page.

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A few things you can try:

  1. Add one of the "Attention Seeker" effects from this library to the 'Free Consultation' button.

  2. Get rid of the animating down arrow. You need not point the user in that direction. It's the only way he can go anyway (either by clicking on the menu links or by the natural tendency to scroll).

  3. If possible, can you keep the form 'on page' like all other sections instead of opening it in a overlay? (like the contact form on my brother's site)

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One of the problems may be that your main call to action fits too well with the page, it doesn't pop out visually. The main visual is mostly red. so the red button blends in with that. Also, it's flush with the header, so it's not perceived as a distinct element. Ironically, the "Need Help" button stands out much more than the main call to action, because it's distinct in color, location and shape.

Here's a comparison of the current design and the way that it looks once you give it a different color and some margins.

enter image description here

There's a bunch of other things you can do to increase the efficiency of your CTA's, many are covered in this article in Smashing Magazine: Call to Action Buttons: Examples and Best Practices.

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I personally don't think making it purple will make it stand out more. It's the same color as the logo. Looking at the two screenshots I think the red one is more prominent. –  Paul Feb 27 at 8:09
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When you look at it here the red is surrounded by the whitespace on this page. Also, I don't suggest making it purple, it was a color I picked at random. The point is it shouldn't be red. –  Vitaly Mijiritsky Feb 27 at 8:12

If you look at a collection of heatmaps of websites you'll see that the top right corner is a 'cold zone'.

The focus of your website will primarily in the middle. I'm guessing from the top left, over the first menu buttons and then down the middle with multiple glances to the bottom right corner because of the animated button.

I suggest relocating your call to action to the middle and repeat it multiple times in the different sections of the page. You could even change the copy to match the section it is in.

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