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Many large e-commerce retailers are using "quick views" for products on their collection pages where more details appear either on-hover of via some other trigger.

Has anyone performed any A/B tests as to the effectiveness of this method/feature and it's effect on conversion rates? If so, what were the results?

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4 Answers 4

The ecommerce company I work for uses modals (pop-ups) to show a quick view of products. Google Analytics doesn't detect this interaction (no trigger was set on it either) so I don't have any data of people who click on the quickview vs. people who navigate to the products detail page. After implementation the effect of it (on conversion rates or something else) hasn't been recorded. If I look back now, I can't see any specific change in the conversion rate in the analytics in the period after introducing the quick view option. The conversion rate was influenced by a lot more changed made to the website around that time. So in short: superficial analysis shows no change in conversion rate after adding the quickview method.

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My Theory: Quick View is an attempt to fix a collections page conversion issue in a heavy handed / broad manner without having done the proper user research. The real solution would be to A: Figure out why customers are not finding the correct product easily, and B: Fix this by including the required information directly on the collections page (ie: Show available color swatches; multiple product image angles on rollover (mrporter.com); product reviews (rei.com); Where the product is manufactured (mec.ca); Rich filters/search; Available sizes; etc...) –  Alex Czarto Jan 17 at 10:07
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Actually quick view doesn't change any conversion rates. If anything, quick view helps save user bandwidth and time. It becomes very cumbersome for the user to goto the product page only to find out that the product is not something that they like. So, quick view might decrease the page views or click rate but not conversion rates. If the products are good, SEO is done inside out then the conversion rates will be high.

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Curious: what do you mean by "SEO is done inside out"? –  Marjan Venema Jan 8 at 7:22
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"Common sense" would seem to indicate that if something "helps save user time" then it should have a positive influence on conversion rates? –  Alex Czarto Jan 8 at 8:56
    
Quick view usually reduces the number of hits for some products as pointed out by some customers/users. To keep it intact or better on an upper side, maybe Google can help thru' good SEO. @MarjanVenema –  Dhananjay Garg Jan 8 at 18:38
    
@AlexCzarto From what I have noticed, quick view helps save time, users are happy to use it since it helps them make informed decision about the product i.e., whether to buy it or not. But making a good site doesn't mean your conversion rates will increase. For that you need better product. –  Dhananjay Garg Jan 8 at 18:41
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There are some important benefit for "Quick View" methods for example:

Reduces server load. Since the information on the product is already stored on the page — hidden behind the scene — the page does not get reloaded when the visitor enables this feature. It is simply taken from a hidden state and put into a visible state. Blockquote

Expedites shopping. Visitors can quickly add products to their carts without having to wait for the actual product page to load. Having the ability to browse through a category page and read expanded product details in the quick view without having to load the product page, will shave crucial seconds off the shopping experience.

Discounts to MAP. Manufacturers sometimes require a “minimum advertised price” policy that limits merchants in how they list product prices below MAP on their websites. But MAP policies do not typically apply to quick view modals. Thus, merchants can show discounted — below a manufacturer’s minimum advertised price — product prices on the quick view. Show discounted pricing, other details. You can utilize the quick view feature to show discounted product prices before the cart page.

You can find more here: http://www.practicalecommerce.com/articles/3310-Using-Quick-Views-to-Increase-Conversions or http://www.electricvine.com/blog/webdesignnj/index.php/2012/06/5-e-commerce-optimization-trends/

In terms of ROI i think it's not easy to track this action to the number of products sold because there are to many variables during the process of buying.

What you can try to do track using custom events or A/B testing to understand if the "add to cart button" is clickable on the product page or in the Quick view mode.

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Reduces Server load: This is one I've heard before but that I don't believe. Server load would only be reduced under certain ideal scenarios/ratios of product page views vs product quick views to render. And even then, you are saving on page requests, but not necessarily on server load, since the server still needs to render quick views for ALL the products on the collections page. –  Alex Czarto Jan 17 at 9:36
    
Expedited Shopping I think saying that quick views expedite shopping and "save crucial seconds" is a big assumption (which I think is false). The point of this question is to find empirical evidence as to the exact effect of quick views. –  Alex Czarto Jan 17 at 9:39
    
ROI I disagree that this is hard to track. I think it is very easy to track. Setup an A/B test. A: No quick view; B: Quick View. See which converts better. I was hoping someone had already run this type of test and was hoping to see the results. :( –  Alex Czarto Jan 17 at 9:41
    
I have read Practicalecommerce article and i believe that it's true. We have tried this on our customer's Magento store and to our surprise we have noted a significant 6% increase in conversion. It's still early to show the exact numbers here but something has started working for us. I think we have clearly reduced the friction involved in browsing product detail pages. –  AshishNayyar Apr 9 at 10:20
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My Theory:

Quick View is an attempt to fix a collections page conversion issue in a heavy handed / broad manner without having done the proper user research.

The real solution would be to A: Figure out why customers are not finding the correct product easily, and B: Fix this by including the required information directly on the collections page (ie: Show available color swatches; multiple product image angles on rollover (mrporter.com); product reviews (rei.com); Where the product is made (mec.ca); Rich filters/search; Available sizes; etc...)

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