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What do you think? I have a little window with one content control. What is the best control to edit a Yes/No value? At the beginning i used a combobox,now a radiobutton. Maybe is a checkbox better? Depending on usability issues, what would you use? What is your opinion on that?

If it is the radio button, do you can provide an example of style so that this radio button looks pretty?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by ChrisF, Izhaki, Benny Skogberg, Erics, 3nafish Nov 30 '13 at 19:19

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Ziggy. I have read your question trice and it is Klington to me. Perhaps you mean "Pros and cons of controls to select 'Yes/No' options". It is unclear what you are asking. While I'm sure it is clear to you, please consider the fact that not everyone know your case like you do. Please revise your question. –  Izhaki Nov 30 '13 at 0:28
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i think i get you, and have answered accordingly, however, for future reference you should ask for conclusive answers with evidence to back them up, not opinions, also, as this is a UX site, the questions often transcend the development stack, i.e. whether you are using LAMP, .NET or developing a physical interface, the same UX question may apply. If your question seems to rely heavily on a particular development stack (this one doesn't), you may want a different Stack Exchange site. –  Toni Leigh Nov 30 '13 at 11:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For a yes/no selection a checkbox is best, or something that functions like a checkbox.

For example, stack overflow votes up or down, click once to vote, and again to undo.

Another example is a facebook like, click once to like, then again to unlike.

This is a very common UI pattern for yes/no or other Boolean choices and transcends the development stack. It is common amongst physical interfaces as well as software ones.

Radio buttons require finding two targets to toggle, whereas a checkbox doesn't.

As for pretty, with javascript and css you can make your yes/no look like anything. Again, this site, what is essentially a checkbox is made to look like a highlighted up or down arrow.

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Thanks Colin, it was helpful! –  Ziggy Nov 30 '13 at 16:21

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