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We are currently building a "find cab" app. The search results needs to be more relevant to show cabs that have the most probability to be available and closeby.

Since I have so many search results, its crazy for a customer to choose between the cabs. I would rather give a set of top relevant results first and allow the customer to choose one of them before I show the entire list.

So I am thinking of many criteria to choose which results are most relevant. For example

  • When a cab driver signals the system that he is free, and a second cab driver follows him. The system should mark the second cab driver as "most probably free".
  • The closest free cab.
  • The cab driver closest, free and highest rated.

While I do this, I am not able to choose my words appropriately. How do I communicate to the customer "most probably free" ?

The current screen looks like this.enter image description here

I was thinking of making the following changes

  • From Cabs Around Me To Cabs Available (top 5 results)
  • Throw a "more" or a "show all" button on the footer
  • The relevant results should have some kinda border to signify that its kinda specially selected for the customers benefit.

Please share ideas on how am I to make this thing look, relevant and useful.

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2 Answers 2

There are some thoughts on your app.

  • Personality
    I like the idea of driver's name in results. It gives the feel of personality. Why don't step further? Add more personal info. It engages users, brings more emotions and sociality in your app. This extra could be drivers' photo and car model. Personality could be crucial on making decision, like "I know this guy, he is really funny" and more different scenarios.
    enter image description here
  • Perceived simplicity
    Hide tech details like km and others, leave it to internal algorithm. Minimizing tech details you take off the responsibility for the decision from user. Don't push them to math and compare operations, they are boring. Too much details make decision harder and leaves users unhappy.
  • Create values
    It's probably have no much sense for user 1.5km or 2km distance to nearest cab. Moreover, it's tech details. What is has value for a user is how quick he could get a cab. It's a function of a distance, but you push users to calculations. Instead of distance, display average time for getting a cab! You could also take into account traffic in calculations. But again, leave it to algorithm, show the real value to users.

I think this

When a cab driver signals the system that he is free, and a second cab driver follows him. The system should mark the second cab driver as "most probably free".

breaks natural queue ordering and will push drivers to a trick like constantly re-signal their state for not staying first in queue.

And this

The relevant results should have some kinda border to signify that its kinda specially selected for the customers benefit.

lead me to question: are you going to display not only relevant results?

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Ideally you'd want to show a time-to-pickup (how long it will take for the cab to pick you up). The time-to-pickup could be computed (given distance between cab and pickup point and availability) or estimated by the driver. A reputation system would be needed to reward drivers that accurately estimate response times.

A feedback/reputation system would in general be useful. Also a personal "favorites" marker or simply previously used drivers could be indicated. People might prefer to wait longer for a driver they know. "Least favorites" might also be good to record.

I'd make time-to-pickup the sorting metric, and clearly indicate reputation, favorites, etc. as decorations on the list entry. To many options (e.g. being able to pick from many sorting criteria) can make it overly complex.

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