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I have searched around here and looked at How should I divide my site between B2B and B2C? which doesn't quite resolve the specific issue we have and am hoping someone may have some ideas around this?

We run an annual online event which is sold in to businesses who register on our website and are then contacted and managed through the sales process by our sales staff. Once the business is registered and paid for, the business then rolls out registration to the actual online event to their wider employee base (they have to form teams within their business and there is a finite 'registration period').

For each business, they are given their own unique registration portal which is customised for them and allows their employees to register.

However, this does not stop many, many employees from all different businesses landing on our main website and seeing the 'register' button (designed for the individual business registration, not for participating employees) and then flooding our systems with accidental business registrations.

We have a very prominent split on the main site's registration page which forces users to select from 'I'm a business looking to register' and 'I'm an individual employee looking to participate' before being able to proceed, but this still doesn't prevent thousands (if not tens of thousands) of individuals accidentally registering via the 'register' page, especially in the immediate run up to the event starting. Since we support a large user base (over 1/4m this year and more next year), this represents a significant admin / data cleansing / customer service overhead, so I was wondering if anyone has any other ideas around any better ways of handling this please?

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To clarify, do users bypass the first main registration split page or do they make the wrong choice at this point? –  micap Aug 8 '13 at 8:37
    
@micap they make the wrong choice. Basically, they know their company is offering something provided by us and the registration portal url for their company isn't always communicated to them and isn't all that memorable, so they head to our marketing site and see a 'register' button (intended for business sign up, not individual participants) and think it's for them. –  David Aug 8 '13 at 12:15
    
Does registering as part of a 7 person team play a part in the user's decision when deciding which registration to click on? What other differentiator is provided to help the user decide? Is there a way for them to get to the unique registration portal from there? The answers to your question may be specific to your business requirement and user interfaces, hence all the questions. –  micap Aug 8 '13 at 13:10
    
No, it doesn't - it's simply a 'register now' screen on our marketing site which is not intended for 'participants' at all. However, if they do hit this page, the top of the screen has 2 prominent buttons (they can't submit anything or even see a form without selecting one of the options) which force the user to identify if they are a business looking to register to take part OR if they are a participant who is trying to register as part of a team. There is no way for them to get to the reg portal from here as the marketing site is effectively anonymous. –  David Aug 10 '13 at 5:16

1 Answer 1

Could you implement a search-as-you-type functionality when a user enters a company name and alert them if their company is already registered?

Workflow:

   1. User enters their name, etc.
   2. User enters company name.
   3. While typing, system checks for an existing company with that name.
   4. If a match is found, display an alert to the user asking them to confirm.
   5. User confirms and the information they fill out on the public form is sent to the backend as if they filled out a form via the   
employer's portal.

Obviously if you need more/less info for users that should be registering as part of their employer's company, you'd want to show/hide any pertinent fields.

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Only concern with that approach is that it would reveal company names to anyone who wanted to find out (something which we can't really do as a business because a number of our clients prefer not to be identified / identifiable). One other thing which I stupidly didn't mention in my original post was that users registering via the employer portal need to register in teams of 7, so it will be difficult to manage unless we get employers to somehow put these 'floating' registrants into teams via the backend –  David Aug 8 '13 at 10:40
1  
Could you enable this feature for the companies who don't mind their name being in the search like this? If they're the majority, you could still get a lot of benefit by catching their employees before they mis-register. –  vincebowdren Aug 9 '13 at 10:28
    
Perhaps, although these registration portals for companies (if easily accessible by others) could open up the possibility of non-employees registering as part of a company-paid exercise. We try to avoid this by (a) making the unique registration portal unique and hard to guess, and (b) admin controls for companies to ensure they can approve / reject individuals and teams who sign up, in case they are not sanctioned. I wonder if selling the idea in to businesses may be tricky because it may help us, but only opens up risk and extra work for the employers? –  David Aug 10 '13 at 5:20

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