Take the 2-minute tour ×
User Experience Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for user experience researchers and experts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

One semi-standard feature of e-commerce sites is the auto-zoom of a product image once you're on the product details page. I've always felt this feature to be clumsy and annoying whenever I am shopping online. Depending on what product you're looking at, zooming in is just awkward.

I did some searching but could not find any information or recommendations surrounding this practice or data (or even unfounded claims) on their effectiveness.

Does anyone have any data or references concerning this practice that provides recommendations in terms of the products or situations in which having such a feature is useful?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Ideally the zoom feature is useful when you want the user to be able to observe and appreciate intricate details that make a product attractive or useful. Though smashing magazine recommends extremely large product images to allow the user to understand the features and design of a product at a glance,

Either provide large images right on the product page or allow users to click on an image to zoom in. You want users to be able to view the image as large as is practical on an average monitor. This means an image that enlarges to 1024×768 pixels is a good size to aim for.

large images might not scale too well the site design and hence the zoom feature allows the user to look into specific details which might not be visible in the general view

Another aspect is that since the shopping is online, for products such as shoes or clothes people cannot feel the texture and the ability to zoom in allows them to visualize the kind of material which is used to make the product. To quote this article on types of product images :

One of the downsides of e-commerce is that no matter how hard you work on you product pages the customer will never be able to have the real product in his hand, as you normally can when going to a physical store. Therefore the customer can never feel the fine texture of the silk cloth, the sturdiness of the titanium lock, or the precise assembly quality of the camera. For some product categories (apparel comes to mind) these tactile experiences is a major part of the overall shopping experience and a decisive purchasing factor.

enter image description here

To close some of the gap between e-commerce and actually holding the product in your hand, textural images can be used. Textural images are extreme closeups that take the customer in so close that you can clearly see the texture and assembly quality. In practice this is often provided by either a zoom functionality for a high-resolution product image, or it is a separate image in the gallery providing a close-up of a part of the product.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.