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I have little design experience.

Here is what my site looks like.

Favicons and user images are added dynamically but the site looks sparse otherwise.

How can I add content. I don't want to grab random images off the web b.c. this would look patchy?

Any ideas on how to fill all the whitespace?

Note that the image below is not picking up the grey to well?

#f5f5f5

and

#e5e5e5

enter image description here

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You might find this interesting: ux.stackexchange.com/questions/30756/… –  Zar Mar 10 '13 at 0:47
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marked as duplicate by JonW Mar 10 '13 at 1:13

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2 Answers

Just as JohnGB described, white space isn't something you fill up, rather it's an opportunity to focus the users on what they need to look at.

There's no reason why certain elements on your page can't be centered and made larger.

There are many form examples on Dribbble that may inspire you.

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Whitespace is a design element, not something that you need to try and fill.

When looking at a design, one client might say “oh, there is so much wasted space!” or some might say, “the colors are great but I think we need to put something to make it look lighter for the eye”. Both of them are referring to one thing:White Space. Oftentimes, white spaces are overlooked.

The above quote comes from 11 Reasons Why White Spaces are Good in Graphic Design. I would also recommend reading Whitespace in Web Design: What It Is and Why You Should Use It

In short, you should use whitespace to help focus you users' attention on the purpose of your page.

Imagine what Google's homepage would have looked like had all the whitespace been filled. The whitespace adds to it, but removing what does not add to the purpose of the page. enter image description here

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