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How many people sign up with a wrong (mistyped) email address when:

  1. you have a "confirm email" field
  2. you don't have a "confirm email" field

There is a very similar question on ux.se but it doesn't tackle the main question (namely if "confirm email" fields work or not)

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I found THIS ARTICLE on the subject. However it doesn't say to what extent this strategy improves having no confirm email field, which is why this isn't posted as an answer, but the article does promote the use of it with good reasoning. –  AndroidHustle Nov 5 '12 at 9:44

1 Answer 1

In response to a question Do "confirm Email" Boxes In Sign-up Forms Work? on a marketing resources website, Steve Alker at UniMax Solutions writes as follows (my emboldening):

I’ve never come across any published data to say that it actually improves the ratio of people who fill in a form in over the percentage of people who decide to move on without completing the form.

There is however internal data from HP and Dell and informal feedback from CRMGuru, IT Business Edge and Technology Evaluation Centres which indicates that for sign-up pages which are a requirement for newsletters, white papers or other user demanded free information, that it does not diminish the sign-up rate to any appreciable extent.

You must understand that for at least the latter 3, the data is not really scientific, because it is before and after changes to the validation procedure on their websites were introduced, not as a result of a single or double blind market test with a control group, but it looks pretty convincing – you don’t lose people.

As a means of preventing unintentional incorrect email addresses being entered, the improvements cited has been as high as 41% and as low as 27% but at either end of the range, that is impressive.

I'm inclined to think that the percentages above refer to the improvement in the number of bad addresses, rather than the actual percentage of bad addresses. I agree there is not enough information in the quote and that this should not be used for making evidence based decisions.

The only good evidence on which to make decisions would be the OP's own A/B testing on signups with and without the confirm email address field.

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Thanks for your answer Roger. I found this article before I posted here and it gives some hints, but it only cites relative % so I still don't really know how big the problem is. –  Phil Nov 5 '12 at 10:03
    
It's nice to see a citing, but I have to say that I find those figures hard to believe! That would mean that about one third of all sign-ups people perform in general involve them entering an incorrect email address!? (Unless my maths is totally off) And that just sounds too much to be true. –  AndroidHustle Nov 5 '12 at 10:05
    
@AndroidHustle - I'm inclined to think that the percentages refer to the improvement in the number of bad address, rather than the actual percentage of bad addresses. I agree there is not enough information in the quote and that this should not be used for making evidence based decisions. The only good evidence would be the OP's own A/B testing on signups with and without the confirm email address - in fact - I'll add that to my answer - thanks for the prompting :-) –  Roger Attrill Nov 5 '12 at 10:15
    
@RogerAttrill Ahh, I bet you're right. I think you're spot on about the A/B testing. When I tried to investigate this subject I searched for posted A/B testing for sign up procedures with/without a confirmation email input-field, with no luck. I would gladly invite the OP to perform this test and it would be delightful if he could post his findings here. =D –  AndroidHustle Nov 5 '12 at 10:20
    
After the edit this definitely deserves a +1. –  AndroidHustle Nov 5 '12 at 10:21

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