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My project specification requires we place a listen button (making voice reader active) on every webpage in our system. I'm wondering where to place this kind of button.

Many website items (such as breadcrumbs, font size increase buttons, link to legal T&C's etc.) have a typical location that users would expect that item to be found in but is there an expected position on the page for a button that will read out the webpage content to the user?

Below an example of webpage with a listen button above the body area.

enter image description here

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Could you please give us additional details on what this button would be doing or provide a wireframe/mockup/image illustrating your question please. –  JeffH Jun 20 '12 at 20:15
    
One thing to keep in mind is that you will want to make sure your page is optimized for accessibility in it's own right, your text-to-speech functionality notwithstanding. Many (most?) users of screenreader software will want to use their reader, not yours. It's important that your content follows best practices for accessible coding so the user can, in fact, use their own reader app (e.g. VoiceOver, JAWS, etc.) –  Daniel Newman Jun 22 '12 at 17:13
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1 Answer

I think in general the placement is right. It is near similar auxiliary / accessibility functions. These are often places towards the upper right of an article.

Some thoughts: - You may consider placing these in a single row. - Think about placing all of these buttons in a position that doesn't interfere with the heading. There is something not quite right about the placement and they way it makes the heading wrap.

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I think the screenshot in the question is just an example of the type of button the OP is referring to, not the actual site it will be used on. –  JonW Jun 21 '12 at 11:11
    
But anyway, I agree that it belongs with the accessibility controls as this item is an accessibility control itself. –  JonW Jun 21 '12 at 11:25
    
Ah yes, I missed that. Thanks. –  Jay Jun 21 '12 at 11:45
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