Take the 2-minute tour ×
User Experience Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for user experience researchers and experts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am struggling with the design of my web application.

I am showing a dialog for my Create/Edit item views:

enter image description here

Thats fine so far for the Edit/Create view.

But how should the dialog look when the user wants to delete some items?

enter image description here

I really want to show the delete item stuff in a dialog, because it does not fit at all into my main layout.

What do you think about the Delete organisation unit dialog?

What do you expect when an item is selected and you press the delete button?

UPDATE:

What would you expect now when the delete button is pressed and some units are selected for deletion? Should the dialog close or not? and WHY ?

share|improve this question
    
Have you thought of the button labeled Close? –  dnbrv Apr 16 '12 at 18:34

3 Answers 3

From your layout screen I assume one can select multiple items and press delete. On doing so, if the dialog still remains open, probably a Close button would make more sense than cancel. Otherwise Cancel is just fine.

Also, have you considered moving all cancel/close to a window close layout (window action control on top right on Windows and top left on Mac)? This is the way going forward in most applications as this saves space, keeps the UI less cluttered and utilizes platform default standards to close a dialog/window.

share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted specifically for the second paragraph. –  David Kiger Apr 20 '12 at 2:22
    
I updated my question! :) –  Pascal Apr 22 '12 at 18:41
    
There are still 3 approaches and you need to decide on use-case. 1) You close the dialog/replace the dialog content with a success message on successful deletion or show an error message in same dialog somewhere on failure. The disadvantage is that user will be stuck on this dialog until the task is complete and an acknowledgement is received from the system which is synchronous task. 2) Make the dialog asynchronous and close it. On success or failure show the another alert box. 3) If the user is expected to delete frequently, keep him/her on same dialog with message. This is also synchronous. –  djagatram Apr 24 '12 at 7:13

I think Delete is a high risk operation, so do not discard warning because you try to save place or make the UI clear.

My opinion is if the delete object is not very important(like it doesn't include other information in it), your third design is ok - click delete to delete them, or click X to close the window. After you click Delete, give a warning message on you webpage, tell user he/she deletes something, he/she can undo it, and it disappears before next operation.

If the delete object is very important, you should give warning message just on the window and give two button like Sure, I am sure; No, I don't want to delete it.

share|improve this answer

Using the dialog I suggest to use a "Back To..." button instead of the "Cancel"; even "Close" may create confusion in some user and "Back To..." it's now a more familiar concept for many user. In the dialog per se a check box on the left of every line of items will help the user too.

share|improve this answer
    
Why should "Back To..." be a more familiar concept for many user NOW ? –  Pascal Apr 22 '12 at 19:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.