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I'm blind and I would like to add the support of a JSF framework in my project. I would know if you know of a framework that is focused on accessibility and that has these three components:
1) A component that permits to start to write a string and than suggeted the similar rows find on DB (like p:autoComplete in PrimeFaces)
2) A component that create a calendar where select a date; 3) A component that manage the upload or download of files. These are the basics, if you know a framework that would allow me to create files like odt, pdf and additional types I will be happy!

P.S.: If you don't know if a framework is accessible but you know a good demo site,please tell me it and I will test the demo...

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This question will be best asked on StackExchange since we don't discuss code libraries here. –  dnbrv Feb 27 '12 at 16:43
    
@dnbrv - don't you mean Stack Overflow? –  ChrisF Feb 27 '12 at 20:58
    
Yah. Just noticed the embarrassing typo. =) –  dnbrv Feb 27 '12 at 20:58
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@dnbrv : The problem is that, probably, this question in stackoverflow could be considered very generic, here we talk about accessibility, usability and ecc... so I thought that this was the best place... however, if some mod think the same thing, please move this question and sorry for my error. –  Filippo1980 Feb 28 '12 at 10:18

2 Answers 2

These two pages have some ideas:

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It would be great if you could summarize some of the points from those articles. –  dnbrv Feb 27 '12 at 20:48
    
@Kedar : I will read those articles but its seem very generic and, as I said before, the accessibility problems appear only when I tried to add some external frameworks and not with "only" JSF2 standard framework. –  Filippo1980 Feb 28 '12 at 10:26

Can I suggest not using JSF? As a front end dev, I'm finding JSF to be continually behind the curve in terms of front-end code.

To be fair, nearly every programming framework that depends heavily on the IDE tends to lack when it comes to front-end accessibility. However, JSF seems to be one of the more stubborn options. Our dev team has to routinely built custom JSF tags to enable spitting out the most rudimentary modern HTML.

If you just use JSF, I'd encourage you to relegate it to purely server-side tasks. Retrieve all data via AJAX and JSON and hand over the front-end UI to a competent and accessible framework instead (Sencha Touch, jQuery UI, etc.)

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well I choose JSF because I'mworking with JAVA and it seemed (six months ago) a goodand innovative solution (my collegue work with Struts 1.2 and I worked with Oracle ADF...) now I will see the two frameworks that you suggest but, for me, the accessibility problems appear when I would add some external frameworks like PrimeFaces and ICEFaces and not before... –  Filippo1980 Feb 28 '12 at 10:24
    
It can work, but most front end developers hate it, myself included. I'm not a fan of any dev platform that outputs HTML based on server-side tags. –  DA01 Feb 28 '12 at 15:11
    
You might look at Wicket, which is Java-based, but has a "lighter touch" when it comes to messing with markup - you have nearly complete control over the HTML. The out-of-the-box widgets are not always highly polished (or accessible), but are often good starting points for extending. It's very flexible. –  peteorpeter Mar 12 '12 at 15:54

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