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I have been asked to create an use case scenarios for the project I am currently in .Though there are some excellent templates on the internet about how to structure a use case scenario,I was confused about whether screenshot's of the actual interaction should be part of the use case scenario and if the answer is yes,how many screenshot's are we looking at ?

Assuming I do insert screenshots ,I was thinking along the lines of

Ideal situation

  • Mockup #1 (Before state)
  • Mockup #2 (After state)

Exceptional case

  • Mockup #1 (Before state)
  • Mockup #2 (After state)

I am just confused about this since there could potentially be several screenshots and I wonder if really thats the way to construct a use case scenario

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need as many screenshots as necessary to adequately communicate the design to the customer. Though, "screenshot" doesn't necessarily mean an actual screenshot. A hand drawing on a piece of paper is often sufficient. In fact, you almost certainly want something low-fidelity unless the design has specific design constraints. If the screenshot is an actual screenshot you may find your customer nitpicking colors and fonts rather than focusing on the layout and flow of the design.

Don't look at the problem by asking "how am I supposed to write a scenario"?". Rather, ask yourself "how can I best communicate the use case to the customer or product owner?".

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Thanks ,I am afraid I cant skimp on providing high fidelity mockups since this use case document is being prepared during the requirements analysis process but more like a functional guideline for the business users with regards to how the portal should be used –  Mervin Johnsingh Dec 20 '11 at 0:18
    
“how the portal should be used” defeats the purpose of a scenario or a use case. Both are rather high-level approaches and both are absolutely user-centered, even if they are hypothetical. Management, developers and designers have to have no say in it. @BryanOakley is right, screenshots give the impression there has already been put a lot of work into the design and its implementation so testees are reluctant to suggest major overhauls. –  Crissov yesterday

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