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I've installed Google Analytics in our company's web applications. The problem is the application use legacy code (frames), so the stats we receive aren't very accurate.

My question is, as a UX designer, shall I work with the stats I have (since I don't have a way to get them accurately)? or shall I discard them and look for other ways to measure the performance and UX (please suggest)?

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3 Answers

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If the stats you have do not help you, I'd suggest sitting down with a developer and figuring out how to best log the statistics you do NEED and actually have some value for you (otherwise it's just a waste).

For example, here's an article about tracking frames that might help your future strategy.

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This depends on how inaccurate the stats are. I would think some stats are better than no stats, but would recommend getting the fixed asap. Analytics should be only one way of feeding in to the UX developments of your application. Consider other approaches such as user testing, expert reviews, heuristic analysis etc.

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First reason to have analytics is to help you get business goals. Can you trust and set actionable metrics from this data?

You may want to add some events and use microconversions. You should try to work from goals to data, not from data to "whatever i get".

Sometimes is better to think which method will give you helpful data so you can get actionable insights (usability heuristics, user tests, card sorting, multivariate tests, a/b tests, survey, field groups, etc)

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